8 Hacks to Quickly Clean Your Apartment Before Moving Out


Trying to quickly clean your apartment before moving out doesn’t have to be a chore. 

Not only can decluttering make your move less stressful but cleaning your apartment can actually save you money.

It’s true: 

Usually, if you leave your apartment in super clean condition, you can earn your deposit back!

Most leasing companies and landlords reserve your initial deposit for cleaning and repair fees after you move out.

By cleaning it yourself, you save them money and time while getting back the cash you put down in the first place!

It’s a win-win situation, right?

So, for this Spruce Your Space post, we sat down with our friends at Berry Swift Cleaning for their most helpful apartment-cleaning hacks EVER.

Take note of these 8 expert-approved cleaning tips that will help you move fast—and get your deposit back—when you’re moving out of your apartment.

Table of Contents

1. Start With a Clean Canvas

You probably think starting with a “clean” canvas sounds like a contradiction, but it’s really not. 

Larger pieces of furniture, kid’s toys, shelves, and cabinets full of items you haven’t used in ages… 

Who wants to clean around all of that

It’s a recipe for disaster. (It makes it easy to lose all motivation, procrastinate, or totally skip cleaning altogether!) 

Instead, Berry Swift Cleaning recommends making sure you prepare to clean your apartment by removing all the clutter in the way.  

“Get everything out—including trash—before you start to clean,” says Jazzmine Berry, co-owner and Brand Ambassador for Berry Swift Cleaning.

This could mean doing a deep declutter or moving your furniture out completely.

And, you know who can help with that?

That’s right.

Movers.

So, first thing’s first: schedule your move a day or two before your apartment lease officially ends. 

Doing this will give you an extra 24 hours to deep-clean your apartment, request repairs, and leave everything a little better than you found it.

It’s much easier to clean your apartment after your furniture and any debris are gone. Plus, you can call maintenance to fix any minor dings or problems for FREE. 

  • You won’t be charged for damages…
  • You will (most likely) get your deposit back…
  • Your leasing office will be happy…

It’s a total win for everybody!  

You can space out your responsibilities rather than trying to clean at the same time as your move—an already super stressful day. 

Takeaway Hack:

Move out 1-2 days before your lease ends so you can clean and schedule apartment maintenance without anything around.

2. Completely Clean From Top to Bottom

Sure, this is an old saying, but Berry Swift advises you to take this advice as literally as possible: 

“Start at the top and work your way down,” Jazzmine says.

It seems obvious, but for people who hate cleaning or who get easily distracted or overwhelmed, it’s a great way to streamline and track what to clean next.

If you don’t find cleaning enjoyable on its own, scrubbing down your apartment before a move can be extra stress on top of an already hectic time. 

That’s why picking an area and cleaning it from top to bottom is so important. 

Chunking parts of a room into smaller, more manageable sections and cleaning it from top to bottom will help you:

  • Easily tackle dirty areas—even if they’re a huge mess
  • Ensure you don’t miss cleaning any spots before moving on to the next 
  • Manage your breaks, especially if you get interrupted or have helpers
  • Document any parts that need to be replaced or repaired (doorknobs, lights, stove drip pans, cabinets, etc.)

Even if you’re not sure how long it will take to clean your whole apartment, it’s so much better and faster to clean from top to bottom, one area at a time.

Takeaway Hack:

Focus on one area of your apartment at a time, and clean it from top to bottom before moving on.

3.  Cut Through Dusty Layers With a Dryer Sheet

What do mini-blinds, stove vents, air conditioner vents, cabinets, and baseboards have in common? 

First of all, they’re common areas where dust tends to accumulate. 

And when dust accumulates over long periods of time, it can tend to be a bit, well, greasy.

This is especially common in areas with higher levels of moisture (like bathrooms or kitchens). 

Gross, but true. 

It can also be pretty difficult to clean sticky dust, particularly if the thing you’re cleaning can’t be sprayed with liquid or a chemical. 

Yes, sprays are great for disinfecting, sanitizing, and imparting a fresh scent, but they just won’t do for certain areas. 

Sticky stove hood vents, dusty blinds, and furniture made from delicate, natural materials all need a different touch. 

In such places, Jazzmine recommends using dryer sheets to get rid of caked-on, dusty layers. 

“Try using a dryer sheet for dust, especially if it’s caked-on,” she says. 

“Especially for buildup on mini blinds, use dryer sheets. Dryer sheets also work for a buildup of grease on cabinets or stove covers!” 

Since dryer sheets are designed to reduce static and they’re coated with a thin layer of wax, they have the added bonus of actually repelling dust, too.

Try swiping a dryer sheet over areas that attract lots of dust, spattered oil, and pet hair. 

Places like electronics, corners, upholstery, shelves, and above-the-stove kitchen appliances are perfect spots.

Takeaway Hack:

Use dryer sheets to remove caked-on or greasy dust and pet hair.

4. Sweep Apartment Baseboards With a Broom

Jazzmine highly recommends using a stiff broom to clean baseboards. 

It doesn’t necessarily have to be a broom, but whatever you use should have stiff bristles. 

“Hand-wiping alone doesn’t work,” she explains. 

“Elbow grease is required to clean baseboards in your apartment. If baseboards need to be wiped down after dusting, you can use water and mild soap and clean them.”

Just don’t be too overzealous when trying this hack…

The stiffer the bristle, the more damage you risk on painted baseboards. 

Brooms typically aren’t coarse enough to scratch through paint. 

You should still be wary of the potential for paint damage if you use anything stiffer than a broom to clean baseboards.

If you rub or sweep too vigorously with a rigid brush, it could scrub off the paint. In turn, you’d have to call maintenance to quickly paint it before you move.

A move is enough to worry about. 

So, you definitely don’t want a lot of avoidable mistakes when cleaning your apartment before moving day. 

Try not to be too rough on your baseboards with this hack.

Takeaway Hack:

Gently clean the baseboards in your apartment with a broom, then wipe down with soap and water.

5. Take Advantage of a Self-Cleaning Oven, (or Use This DIY Recipe Instead)

When’s the last time you even thought about cleaning your oven? 

(Yes, your oven needs to be cleaned, too!)

Jazzmine admits that this hack is more akin to a reminder, but only because so few people actually recall to do it before moving out of their apartment.

“Self-cleaning ovens offer a lot of convenience,” she stresses, “Oven cleaner isn’t required!” 

Lack a self-cleaning feature on your apartment oven and don’t have any oven cleaner?

Berry Swift Cleaning even has a remedy for that.

“Even if you don’t have a self-cleaning oven, you can remove gunk at home,” Jazzmine says.

Below is her do-it-yourself solution for a greener style of oven cleaner:

  1. Mix 1 part baking soda with 1 part dish soap
  2. Spread it all over the interior of your oven, especially on the inner door
  3. Scrub off with a rough sponge or scouring pad  
  4. Wipe it off again using a microfiber cloth and white vinegar

Let’s be honest, it’s also a great idea to clean your oven before in your new place, too. 

I mean, who knows how many years’ worth of splattered food particles is in there?!

Takeaway Hack:

Use the self-cleaning setting on your apartment oven, or clean it with a #DIY baking soda + dish soap + vinegar recipe!

6. Remove Everything From Your Fridge Before Cleaning It

If you’re planning to move out of your apartment, you will probably already have a plan for clearing out your refrigerator and consuming your most perishable food. 

But cleaning the actual fridge isn’t necessarily something you think about before moving out of your apartment.

It’s also one of the dirtiest areas for food spills, odors, and more. 

If you don’t clean it, someone else will have to, and that’s what your deposit is for.

But if your goal is to get your deposit back, don’t stop at packing up your food when it comes to your apartment fridge.

Luckily, our friends at Berry Swift Cleaning have a hack to keep it simple:

“Refrigerator cleaning is easiest if you remove all the food first,” Jazzmine advises. “Fill up your sink with soapy water to instantly remove, wash and dry each shelf as you go!”

Next, all you have to do is individually wash the shelves, drawers, and remaining caddies with a degreasing soap.

Simply dry the pieces with a microfiber cloth and place them back into the refrigerator. 

You’re done!

Takeaway Hack:

After tossing or packing your food, remove all drawers and shelves from the refrigerator for a more thorough clean.

7. Get Your Carpet Professionally Cleaned

We love fur babies and kids here at 3 Men Movers!

Yet, for all their endearing charm, they can absolutely be messy

If you have children or pets, chances are that you’ve had at least few carpet mishaps.

For pet-parents who live in apartments, you’ve often paid the risk to your apartment upfront with a separate, pricey pet deposit… 

A deposit that exists largely to assume there will be animal-related damage to your flat.

And if they’ve ever left a lingering stain or odor, you’ll definitely be charged for it.

Even excessive pet hair can cost you (and we all know how notoriously pet hair clings to everything no matter what.)

In this case, the best and easiest remedy is to get your carpet professionally cleaned. 

You can certainly do it yourself, but it may be more trouble than it’s worth if you’re trying to simultaneously take care of other pre-move errands…

  • You’d be responsible for renting, maneuvering, and returning any equipment you borrow within the same day… 
  • Plus, it may not be readily available during peak moving season—meaning you could have to wait… 
  • Then, you’ll still have to remove any stubborn stains, odors, or pet hair from the carpet on your own if the rented equipment doesn’t work well enough. 

Not good if you’re on a tight moving schedule!

The good news is that professional cleanings are very affordable and include much more than just a vacuum and shampoo of your carpet.

For example, Berry Swift Cleaning offers a package that will handle 100% of your apartment cleaning needs for under $200. 

It’s a fantastic deal if you don’t have the time to personally clean your apartment before moving out.

Takeaway Hack:

Hire a team to professionally clean carpet to remove stubborn stains, odor, and pet hair.

8. Check the Most Forgettable Areas of Your Apartment

Finally, Berry Swift Cleaning suggests you make a special effort to check the most forgettable areas in your apartment. 

By that, they mean the spots most people completely forget to clean when moving out of their apartments.

The top places most people forget to clean before moving out are:

  1. Top shelves in closets
  2. Bathroom drawers, shelves, and medicine cabinets 
  3. The warming drawer at the bottom of your oven (which often doubles as extra kitchen storage)

Except for the bathroom drawers, these areas also tend to gather the most dust, and—for those with pets—hair, as well. 

It’s important to check them not only so you don’t leave anything behind when moving, but also to clean any grime that’s accumulated over the long term.

Takeaway Hack:

As you clean around your apartment, make sure to open drawers, cabinets, and closets in your bedroom, bathroom & kitchen. This will *visually* remind you to clean them.

Wrapping Up

Now that you’ve got some quick tips on the best ways to clean your apartment, you’ll be ready to move in no time!

Still need some guidance on how to get started? 

We recommend decluttering before you start cleaning. It will help you avoid getting too overwhelmed by trying to clean around items that you should discard.

Get ready to have less stress on your moving day (and more money in your pocket) with these 8 handy hacks for cleaning your apartment!

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Expert Tips on How To Pack Fragile Items for Moving


We all have that special set of delicate china, a family heirloom, glassware, or oddly-shaped ceramic figurine that we want to keep safe when moving.

Broken items are one of the things that people fear most about moving. If you’re packing on your own, it can be a bit difficult to know exactly how to prep your most fragile possessions so they stay intact. For most people, our delicate pieces also tend to have more sentimental value. In cases like this, it can be even more devastating if they are damaged.

Don’t forget, your items will have a very bumpy ride in the back of a moving truck. That’s why it’s crucial to have the correct supplies in order to keep them intact during the trip. 

Want to know the best way to prepare easily broken items for your move?

Read on for expert tips we’ve learned in over 30 years of moving fragile objects for thousands of clients.

Key Supplies You’ll Need to Pack Delicate Items

It may not seem like a big deal, but having the right supplies is vital for keeping your fragile things safe during a move.

Your delicate items risk real damage if you don’t have enough supplies, or have the wrong ones.

Here are the basic packing supplies you need. (Luckily, there aren’t that many, and most of them are reusable)

Must-have packing supplies that you’ll need for fragile pieces:

  • Packing paper (get lots more than you think you need)
  • Bubble wrap
  • Brown paper tape

Optional (but helpful) packing supplies for fragile items:

  • Chipboard
  • Pliable cardboard box dividers 
  • Picture boxes
  • Blankets or towels
  • Cushion paper or kraft paper (at moving supply or hobby stores)

Double-Wrap Items With Paper and Bubble wrap

Keeping your fragile items protected begins with wrapping and packing them properly.

Moving is a lot of, well, movement.

Your delicate items are at risk for suffering damage from the motions of wrapping and packing, plus the wobbling and rattling that happens as your movers carry and load boxes into the truck. 

Not to mention, your things need to survive the drive to each location. Potholes, aggressive drivers, or even long periods in hot weather can affect whether your fragile belongings stay whole.

That said, you’ll want to go above and beyond when packing delicate items to make sure they’re secure.

The trick here is double-wrapping. Do it with each fragile item—especially glassware, mirrors, lamp bases, or oddly-shaped pieces.

Simple 3-Step Process to Double-Wrapping Delicate Items:

  1.  Wrap each item in two layers of bubble or plastic wrap. Use paper for glassware.
  2.  Then, wrap in two layers of packing paper.
  3.  Finally, seal the layers with a little bit of tape.

This method ensures that your fragile items stay securely wrapped during the entire moving process and don’t break when they’re loaded, unloaded, or in transit.

Use Packing Paper as a Cushion Inside Boxes

While you’re packing, try to fill up as much space as possible within each box marked “Fragile”.

That’s where all that extra packing paper will come in handy—especially if you have wine glasses!

Below are some handy pro tips on how to do this.

How To Pack Glassware & Correctly Fill Spaces in Moving Boxes:

  1. Crinkle up pieces of paper into thick wads & add to the bottom of the box before any items go in.
  2. Stuff spaces with crumpled kraft paper, packing paper, or thicker cushion foam paper
  3. Fill up all empty spaces with paper, not just the corners. 
  4. Packing glassware or wine glasses? Definitely stuff some paper inside the bowl after wrapping the body of the glass. 
  5. Wrap paper around the edge of the wine glass bowl, too, for good measure.
  6. After all delicate glass is in the box, add another thick layer of crumpled paper on top .

Want to make sure your fragile items don’t get crushed from above? Top off the paper wad with chipboard before closing the box (it’s much thicker than cardboard)!  

Master Your Move Tip: Avoid using newspaper! It may seem like an easy fix, but the ink will stain your wine glasses or fine china. Soaking and washing dishes is the last thing you want to do after unpacking from your move.

Pack Dishware & Picture Frames With Extra Reinforcement

Have wine glasses, dishes, or picture frames that you need to move?

Consider getting moving boxes that are specifically designed for them. 

Dishware boxes are made with reinforced bottoms so that your heavy-but-fragile items won’t break through when the box is lifted by movers.

You can also wrap dishes with clean bath towels or layer cardboard dividers between each piece. 

Don’t have any cardboard dish dividers? No problem. 

Simply cut off the opening flaps on older, flimsier boxes that are no good to use for moving. 

To properly pack wine glasses or wine bottles for moving, you may want to locate the original box, or purchase a wine glass storage box. Preferably, something made in thick plastic or anything else sturdy.  Either way, make sure these wine glass boxes have dividers and a strong lid

Boxes used for picture frames or mirrors are reinforced on the sides and often come with corner guards (whether foam or thick paper) to protect the ends and fill space in the box.

 No time to get picture boxes? 

Break out your old blankets instead. Your pictures and mirrors will be fine if you wrap and tape them securely enough.

Label Your Boxes on All Sides

Ensure that your movers know that your box contains fragile items and should be treated as such. 

It may seem like a no-brainer, but you want your fragile boxes to stand out when movers are deciding how to load the truck. The best way is to label it on all sides. Got a red marker? Even better!

As movers are glancing around your room, these boxes will be easy to identify if they’re properly and conspicuously labeled. 

To help you unpack more efficiently, also list the contents on the outside of the box 

Wrapping Up

These tips may seem simple but they make a huge difference when it comes to keeping your delicate possessions safe during your move. 

If your items have highly sentimental value (and you don’t want to take any chances), you can also transport your delicate pieces to your new place ahead of time. 

Alternatively, you can transport only those items in your own vehicle on the day of the move. 

P.S. Don’t want to deal with packing fragile items at all? Our professional packers have plenty of experience and would love to assist you. They can even unpack your delicates and organize them at your new spot!


5 Essential Things To Do On Moving Day


 

Moving can either be exciting or overwhelming. If you haven’t prepared or organized all the necessary things to do on moving day, just thinking about it can be downright stressful.
Feeling flustered, like you can’t get a grip on how to make moving day easier?
Even if you feel like a deer in headlights, we’re narrowing down the many things you need to do on moving day to just five essentials.
Stay calm and organized with these top five moving day must-do’s!

1. Empty Your Furniture Drawers

Ever try to move something full that’s heavy even by itself?
Yeah, calling it ‘heavy’ is an understatement.
Imagine how much lighter and easier to move it would be if those items were removed and packed separately.

That’s exactly why clearing out your drawers is a great idea.

Emptying drawers will relieve unnecessary weight, and add these benefits:

  • Furniture is less problematic to load on a dolly or truck
  • Makes your move easier & faster
  • Reduces the chance of breaking or scratching furniture, floors, or walls
  • Is much safer to transport without risking injury
  • Zero chance of your items being damaged or ripped inside shifting drawers
  • Removing & packing items separately gives you a chance to declutter

Some people start planning their move months in advance. Whether you’ve done the same or are packing last-minute, do you really want to risk injuring yourself, your furniture, or the movers?

No matter if you hire one of our 3 Men Movers crews, or are moving alone, remember that emptying your drawers is one of the most important things to do on moving day!

2. Prepare & Disconnect Appliances

Most apartments and rentals provide tenants with in-unit washers, dryers, and refrigerators. However, if you brought your own with you, you’ll probably have to prepare these appliances for moving by yourself.

How to prepare appliances for moving day:

  • Remove food/ supplies from the compartments in each appliance
  • Clean your appliances thoroughly—especially the fridge shelves!
  • Keep the owner’s manual available at your starting and ending addresses
  • Read instructions for disconnecting & reconnecting appliances
  • If not hiring movers, wrap items with thin blankets or shrinkwrap to prevent scuffs

The key here is prepping appliances at least 24 hours prior to your move. Remember that certain appliances—especially refrigerator units—need time to defrost. That can take up to a day, so start early!

It’s also a good idea to clean your dryer vent when you’re moving. Not cleaning it is actually a fire hazard. And, let’s be honest, when will you ever think to do that again, anyway?

3. Do Your Laundry Before Moving Day

It seems like this would be a given… But we’ve seen quite a few stunning things during our 30+ years of moving!

While it should go without saying, packing dirty laundry with your clean dishes or other items in the same box is a terrible idea.

Yes, it’s unsanitary.
Plus, having to do laundry after a looong day of moving is also a massive inconvenience, especially if you don’t have immediate access to a working washing machine.
One of the most important things to do on moving day is your laundry. (And, try to do it 1-2 days ahead.)

You can rest easy knowing that every piece of clothing you unpack is ready to be put away.

And, any towels used to wrap delicate dishes can be placed in the linen closet or used after your refreshing, post-move shower!

Doesn’t that sound nicer than dealing with dirty laundry when you just want to relax?

4. Label Boxes With Items for Each Room

Labeling keeps you organized and helps your movers work swiftly.
And we don’t mean simply scrawling FRAGILE in red marker on one side of a box…

After all, movers will be stacking and loading your boxes on a truck. They must be able to see your labels from any angle they glance.
Make it a part of your packing process to label efficiently.

It may take a bit more time upfront, but it certainly makes your move day run smoothly.

Use these labeling tips to make moving day easier:

  • Label each side of your boxes
  • Use red for boxes with FRAGILE items & add lots of padding
  • Write a number or room where each box will go at the destination
  • Tag what’s in each box (e.g. dishes, glassware, ceramics, etc.)
  • Color-code or number your box labels for each room

It is so much easier to know what items are in each box because it would be difficult trying to find your dishes without labels on your boxes.  

We’ll definitely recommend you label your boxes when moving with us. This way, our crews can move quickly, knowing exactly where to take each box instead of constantly asking you.

4. Keep a Bag With Easy-to-Grab Essentials

Many people are under the impression that moving will only take a few hours.
Truth is, how long moving takes depends on a lot of different factors: if you have kids or pets to care for, if lots of furniture needs disassembly, how many floors you have, if you can reserve parking spots or elevators, how many things you own, if you’re already packed or need movers who pack for you, any time restrictions to move out, and more.

Moving will most likely take the entire day, especially if you have multiple bedrooms or lots of things to pack and unpack.

So if you get hangry easily, need to take medication at certain intervals, have children or pets, or simply need to stick to a tight timeline, it’s crucial to pack a bag of essentials on moving day.

How to prepare for moving day with an essential item bag:

  • Leave out what you’ll use the night before and morning of your move
  • Add all daily medications, vitamins, utensils, portable snacks and water
  • Bag your cosmetics and toiletries immediately after using them
  • Use a sturdy bag that closes, plastic bags can rip too easily in transport
  • Charge handheld electronics and put them in waterproof cases inside your travel bag
  • Add pillows and blankets to your essential bag in case your move runs long

Read Next: Best & Worst Ways to Pack Ahead For a Move

5. Choose the Perfect Timing

Of course, how you move is important. But your move won’t be nearly as carefree if you don’t consider when you move.

One of the biggest things to do on moving day is to get your timing right.

Timing your move can be difficult because of all the different elements that can arise. However, if you realize something might interrupt your move (like major road construction, heavy rain, or a school event that runs late), get in touch with your movers right away.

While sudden issues will require last-minute workarounds, creating a solid plan is still one of the most vital things to do on moving day. Always have a backup plan if possible, and don’t be shy to ask your hired movers about their own backup plans, too.

Whether you are moving out of state, city, or just to the other side of town, it’s better to plan ahead rather than plan as you go.

Wrapping Up

See? With a little organization and prioritization of these simple tasks, you can make your move day much less stressful!

These to-dos will not only help you prepare yourself and your belongings, they’ll also help your movers.

Save yourself some time, money, and stress by following these essential things to do on moving day.


Efficient Moving Advice That Will Make Your Day Successful


It’s move day, and time is money. So you definitely need to know how to move out as efficiently as possible. 

So, what’s the most efficient way to move?

Find out with this essential advice to reduce moving stress and avoid wasting time. 

Tip #1: Communicate About Your Circumstances 

Discussing your moving plans with a friend is a good way to get ideas…. 

Just don’t expect your move to resemble theirs!

So how long will it take movers to load a truck efficiently? 

The structure, accessibility, and layout of each residence are different, so these attributes will definitely affect how long your move take. 

Below are some ways to optimize the efficiency of your move day based on time.

Consider your starting and ending locations:

  • Do you have a one-story 3-bedroom home?  Fewer staircases mean it could take less time to move compared to a similar home with the same number of bedrooms but two stories
  • Living in an apartment or condo? It’s important to let movers know if you have to reserve an elevator or have a time limit to move somewhere new
  • Remember: these movers have never been to your place. Let a booking agent know if there’s anything out of the ordinary. Does your home have odd features or landscapes that could make loading or unloading more difficult? Do you have a roommate or children that would be disturbed by noises?

Knowing these things in advance will help you and your movers determine whether your move could take longer or shorter than average.  

 

Tip #2: Point Out Meaningful Items & Be Thorough

Many people own something with either sentimental or material value.

It could tug at your heartstrings or simply be expensive. 

Either way, tell your moving company and the crew beforehand.

That childhood trinket, professional artwork, special collector’s item, or wedding gift? Movers won’t always assume how special or fragile it is unless you point it out.  

Even if it’s a simple request to be gentle with a certain box, your moving crew wants to make sure you’re happy and comfortable with their service. 

Here’s how to be detailed and let movers know what you want

When you’re booking a move:

  • Inform the agent about anything that you want to be handled with special care (gun safes & ammo, delicate items, items up to or over 500 lbs., etc) 
  • Ask your booking agent to make a note of this for the crew (a responsible company should do this automatically, but request it anyway.) 
  • Be clear on what the moving company will and will not move… (To abide by state regulations and company policies, there are some things movers simply cannot disassemble or transport—like live plants or baby cribs.)

Before move day:

  • Clear packed boxes out of the way so movers can safely and quickly walk between each room to the exit 

On move day:

  • Walk movers through every part of your home and point out anything delicate or special
  • Open closet and cabinet doors to make sure nothing is overlooked
  • Show the crew anything that may need to be double-wrapped
  • Let movers know which boxes are ready to be loaded and which boxes have delicate or heavy items
  • Check all outdoor patios, closed doors, and drawers. Leave everything open as movers are loading so nothing is missed

Remember that extra communication is key.

Almost all moving mishaps are preventable! 

How can you help make your move more efficient? Voice your wishes early so movers can reasonably meet them.

 

Tip #3: Stay Attentive & Focus On The Move

Back to the point about communicating throughout your move: this works best if you stay focused on the move itself.

Now, we’re definitely advocates of a smooth, stress-free move because we train movers to become true professionals in how to handle and transport your items.

Professionals don’t need hand-holding, but they may need to ask important questions that can make or break your move. 

Here are some focused tips that will make your move easier:

  • Stay accessible throughout the day without interruptions or distractions from friends and family who may be there
  • If you can’t be accessible: discuss your move with someone who will be physically present, knows what and how you want to move, and who is authorized to speak on your behalf if there’s a question or concern

If you hire a moving company to help you move, you expect (and should get) professionalism.

Make your move more efficient by occasionally checking in with the crew leader and voicing your concerns or questions. 

 

Tip #4: Call Your Moving Company 

Whenever a service person comes to your place, you should know what to expect, right? The same thing goes for moving crews who you’re relying on for a successful, well-organized move.

Sometimes, things don’t go as planned. Movers are human, too, and the unexpected could happen and directly or indirectly impact your move. 

Don’t hesitate to call the moving company. A phone call to immediately notify the company will take less time and save you the headache of enduring an awkward move if:

  • If anything goes wrong or if movers are late
  • If you have questions about added services or charges
  • If you simply feel uncomfortable (especially if a mover seems ill)….

It’s your move day, and there’s no need to waste time. 

 

Tip #5: Know All Fees (& How They’re Calculated)

Doing research on the moving company you’ve chosen will eliminate a lot of headaches upfront. However, if you want to have a highly efficient move, that’s not where the buck stops.

For example, 3 Men Movers uses a transparent travel fee

This includes the transportation costs of our facility distance to your starting address, the distance from your final address back to our facility.  

Likewise, our hourly rate doesn’t start until we arrive at your first location and you sign the crew in. The clock stops when you sign the movers out at the end of the service. This way, clients have the ultimate approval over their move.

So, not only are such costs explained upfront, but there are no sneaky fees tacked on to the end of your move.

We’ve calculated the transparent travel fee in the most reasonable and relevant way for each individual client. 

Be wary that some extremely common tactics in the moving industry are to:

  • Extra charges for going up or down flights of stairs, handling safes, oversized items, or pianos, etc. 
  • Claim there is no travel fee—then add on fuel costs or the time it takes to get back to the facility (often in rush-hour traffic)
  • Claim that their travel fee is time-based and therefore cheaper… and it certainly looks inexpensive at first

Yes, some movers will find ways to charge you for time spent not actually moving… Unknowing clients then end up paying for the cost of movers to sit in notoriously horrible Texas traffic, or they get charged an hourly moving rate for the driving time!

No matter which moving company you hire, be aware of what you’re paying for and how charges are calculated:

  • Thoroughly read a copy of your rights (all licensed moving companies are required to furnish this for you)
  • Ask the booking agent to explain all services, charges, and fees and how they’re calculated. You need to know what factors will influence the rates you’re paying 
  • Ask if they will hold your items on the truck if add-on fees aren’t paid immediately

Ensure that you understand any time-based charges or potential extras. It will eliminate lots of misconceptions and disappointments. 

 

Tip #6: Ask About Your Moving Crew’s Experience Level

Anybody can move a box, but not everyone can move!

If you’re interested in hiring a moving company, ask about the people who will actually be moving you:

  • Feel free to ask how long a crew has been moving
  • Ask if the crew is experienced in moving specific or delicate items
  • Voice any sensitive issues they should be aware of (e.g. domestic abuse, elderly or sick residents, medical equipment)
  • If you own animals, inform the booking agent in case a crew member has an allergy that would affect the efficiency of your move
  • Request by name any movers you’ve heard of through online reviews or from a friend

One of our Movifestos states, “We respect that your home is sacred.” 

We also back it up with onboarding crews to our expectations, criminal background checks, and ongoing professional training so their skills stay sharp. 

At 3 Men Movers, if you request a crew—perhaps you heard a friend or online reviewer singing the praises of one by name—we’ll honor it. After all, you deserve the move you want.

 

Tip #7: Be Aware of the Claims Process

Heaven forbid you’ll actually need to file a claim, but in case you do, you should know how it works first.

How to find out if a moving company’s claims process will go smoothly:

  • Does the company have carrier liability?
  • Are the movers involved in the claims process? 
  • Do moving crews have accountability or incentives for their claims rates?
  • How does your moving claims process work? 
  • Where do I start by filing a claim—should I call or email?
  • Do I need to provide a receipt or proof of value to get the maximum allowable amount in case of a claim?
  • How long does the claim process take? Are there deadlines?

Personally, at 3 Men Movers, we’re really proud of a claims rate that is consistently less than 3% of thousands of moves over the past few years.

Again, no matter what company you choose, you still need to know how their claims policy will affect you should you need to use it. 

 

Tip #8: Properly Crate or Prepare Unique Items

Musicians have to move too… And so do people with huge armoires. 

Despite how much you own and have to lug into a new place, it’s important to be as prepared as possible before your move day arrives.

Save time by preparing:

  • Box up everything and label anything fragile
  • Number boxes and have corresponding sticky notes/tape for the new rooms they’ll go into
  • Ensure nothing is protruding from boxes that would make them difficult to stack on a dolly or truck 
  • Set out extra blankets on top of items you want movers to wrap (but they’ll also bring their own)
  • If you want to speed up your move, disassemble whatever you can before movers arrive
  • Unplug appliances and take out tubing at least a day in advance (put a towel down for refrigerators)
  • Wrap and place televisions and any fragile glass in their original boxes, if possible
  • Call the moving company if you have any safes over 600 lbs 
  • Find out if safes were drilled into the floor by previous owners 
  • Empty safes before movers arrive (movers can’t transport ammunition)

Special note for musicians:

  • Crate or case musical instruments you want movers to transport (especially stringed instruments like harps and cellos)
  • Let movers know if there is an instrument inside of a case
  • If you don’t have a case but insist that movers handle it, please be prepared to sign a waiver for liability

 

Tip #9: Know Your Storage Facility 

Timing is everything when you’re moving. That’s doubled if you are moving into or out of a storage facility.

If your movers are stopping at a storage location, there are some things to communicate if you want things to go smoothly:

  • Talk to the facility manager in advance to determine if your items will fit.
  • Know the hours of operation for your storage location.
  • Are there deadlines for when a storage facility will no longer accept moves?
  • Is there 24-hour access?
  • Make sure there is a facility manager onsite when you and your movers arrive in case you run into problems or need help.

This is the most significant info you should know before moving into storage (it’s certainly not everything). Understanding your facility and needs will prevent any issues with not having enough room. 

Certainly, you don’t want to spend more money or time than you have to when you’re moving! 

 


Domestic Violence Survivor’s Moving Safety Guide [DOWNLOAD]


Moving out or threatening to leave is the most dangerous thing a domestic violence survivor can do. 

It’s also the most necessary thing a survivor can do. 

This downloadable domestic violence moving safety guide is designed to make it easier. 

It explains not only what you need to do in detail, but how and why. 

This guide is brought to you by our partnership with the domestic violence shelter, Fort Bend Women’s Center (FBWC). 

P.S. We will never sell your personal info.

“It is crucial that you do not tell your abuser, his family, his friends, or any mutual friends of your plans to leave.  This could sabotage your plans, or even worse, cost you your life.”

Peggy Wright, Director of Sexual Assault & Counseling Programs at Fort Bend Women’s Center

Domestic Violence Survivors’ Moving Safety Guide

By leveraging our vast moving assets and crews, we’re driving items donated during a move to the FBWC resale shop, PennyWise. 

Download a Free Domestic Violence Moving Safety Guide

So why are we doing this?

This way, the Center can generate more profits and funds to support survivors who leave and try rebuilding their lives. 

FBWC provides not only shelter, but therapy, connections with legal advocates, access to medical care, training resources, and so much more. 

The help survivors receive is vital. They most often leave with nothing for themselves and their children or pets. 

Stopping family violence is not whimsical, part-time dabbling for us. 

It’s a goal that we will do anything to reach. 

If you have an upcoming move

Let us know during booking, and we’ll take items or furniture you don’t want (with a few restrictions) as donations. 

Not only is it one less thing you have to worry about, but you’ll feel better knowing that it ended up in a much more useful place than a landfill.  

If you’re not moving but still want to help

There are still ways you can support FBWC and domestic violence survivors. Please consider giving in one of the following ways:


Best & Worst Ways to Pack Ahead for a Move


Trying to pack ahead for a move can be overwhelming. Depending on how many things you own, you may even feel tempted to procrastinate. 

But, packing all your stuff definitely isn’t something you want to do the day before you move—especially if you don’t know what to do!

If you’re wondering where to start, read this guide for advice on right and wrong ways to pack ahead before a move. You can also check out Episode 1 of our YouTube video series, Master Your Move

In the video interview and post below, Norma, one of our Moving Experts has a unique background in claims which gives her great insight on how to pack for a move early to prevent damage.  She’s passionate about helping people simplify their moves and keep them damage-claim free by knowing what to expect and what to do before a move.

So, read on to learn what and how to pack ahead of your movers’ arrival!

 

 

 

Packing Do’s: Best Ways to Pack Ahead of Time for a Move 

No matter how you plan on moving, if you’re not hiring packers, it’s a great idea to do some packing yourself.

It’s equally important to pack correctly. This will reduce the chance that any accidents or injuries occur during your move. 

Here are the best tips for packing ahead of your move—and how to do it right so you don’t waste time or damage your stuff. 

1. Fold or Vacuum-Seal Clothes in Luggage

Movers will move practically anything (anything that’s not illegal or a safety liability). Lucky for you, that includes luggage and suitcases!

Instead of worrying about what you’re going to do with your wardrobe, break out your travel luggage and use it to pack clean clothes before your move. 

Your suitcase is much safer than a box, so this is a great way to protect any fabric that is thin, beaded, fringed, delicate, or otherwise expensive. 

If you have a vacuum-sealer bag system, you can get even more clothing into your suitcase.

Remember to remove any luggage tags or attachments that could get snagged during your move. 

2. Use Towels to Perfectly Wrap Dishes for Moving

Contrary to what some YouTubers say, if you’re wondering how to move bowls and dishes, simply stacking them in a box is not a good idea.

Newspapers are often way too thin to keep dishes from rattling around, then chipping or breaking. So, Norma recommends wrapping dishes in bath towels and marking the box FRAGILE as much as possible: 

“Definitely mark the box as much as possible. Usually, the top and the side of the box are best to mark… Again, the movers are going to move very quickly. They’re used to [our] packers labeling the box all the way around, right. So they just look at it and see what’s fragile…It’s good to make it very legible: easy to read, quick to read.”

—Norma 

3. Color-Code Boxes & Number New Rooms 

Whether it’s a bright permanent marker, colorful tape, or your kid’s school paint, color-coding your boxes can speed up your move.

Movers find it helpful to know where boxes go based on their color labels, which helps them move faster (example: red for fragile items, blue for baby toys, etc.) 

Take it up a notch and also write numbers on boxes based on the rooms you want them in at your new destination.

Then, use a sticky note or wall-safe tape to mark the rooms with the matching box numbers.

4. How to Pack Plants for Moving

Legally, movers aren’t allowed to move any potted plants in the back of the truck.

“It’s under the Texas Department of Transportation Rules and Regulations,” Norma explains.

“We do help customers move them, but we just put them into their vehicles so they can safely get them moved.”  

If you have to move a potted plant, invest in a good floor tarp for your backseat because you’ll probably have to move it in your vehicle. 

5. Disassemble & Pack Your Lamps Early

Lamps might not seem like a big deal until you’re paying movers by the hour and they have to stop and take them all apart. 

For more complicated items like lamps with removable or small parts, your move will go much faster if you break it down and wrap any pieces long before your movers arrive. 

6. Prepare Child and Pet Equipment 

Kiddie equipment is simple to move if it’s foldable, and disassembling child furniture before your move will make it easier for movers to stow it on the truck

However, there are some things no reputable, professional crew will move, (like cribs or playgrounds).

Items like these are too high-risk to disassemble and reassemble, mostly because they vary so widely in their manufacturing, parts, etc. Improperly reassembled cribs or play equipment can seriously injure children, so it’s not a good idea to let just anyone do it.  If you can’t do it on your own, we highly suggest getting a representative or contractor from the manufacturing company to reassemble child beds, playgrounds, dressers, and more.

Movers are people too, and lots of people are allergic to pets.

To make your move go faster, make sure pet supplies—like kennels, doghouses, scratch posts, litterboxes, etc—are clean and disassembled/ folded if possible.

The cleaning part is especially important. 

Even so-called hypoallergenic pet breeds carry allergens that can cause an attack in people who are allergic. 

You don’t want a mover to have an allergic reaction or have to pause your move while you pay by the hour.  

7. Clear a Walking Path For Your Movers

So you already packed and have everything ready to go except the larger stuff? Great! The last thing to do before your movers arrive to clear a path so they can get to work. Besides being a safety hazard, having boxes in the way won’t make your move as efficient.

Moving crews tend to load the heaviest items into their trucks first, so it’s essential for them to have access to these and to the exits. Transfer packed boxes off to the side or against the walls of a bare area. 

The clock is ticking! So if movers have to remove obstacles that are in the way of your larger furniture, it will take longer and cost more. 

 

Packing Don’ts: Mistakes May Cost You Time, Money (or both)

Packing the wrong way can end up causing your move to move slower than normal.

Poor packing can alsoresult in damages that would be prevented with good planning, materials, or techniques. 

1. Having Open Boxes Lying Around 

Having open boxes is a big no-no.

Why?

Movers are coming into your home to work quickly

If you haven’t reserved packing services—which is best done before movers arrive—it will take longer to seal and stack open boxes.

Professional movers don’t stow open boxes in their trucks where items could fall out and get lost, become damaged, or cause damages.

Additionally, not all professional movers are also trained in proper packing techniques. (At 3 Men Movers, we train all of our crews to pack the right way, but you’ll need to ask your preferred company about their procedures.)

Movers also may think you’re not finished and will be storing these items in your personal vehicle, which can lead to issues with how they load the truck. 

Either way, having unsealed or open boxes lying around will only slow down your move

Whenever possible, try to disassemble any pieces that are oddly shaped and won’t fit in a basic moving box. If you need help disassembling or wrapping an item, ask your movers!

2. Keeping Your Clothes In Dresser Drawers 

Despite the fact that this is a huge ‘don’t’, unfortunately, many people do this a lot

In fact, other less-experienced or less-careful movers may even tell you it’s ok to leave your clothing inside of dresser drawers.  But our response will always be the same: avoid leaving clothing or other items in drawers.

This is an accident waiting to happen because anything that most people keep in a dresser (like jewelry, perfume bottles, clothing, etc) can all get ripped, broken, or even fall in the dreaded, hard-to-reach nether-space behind the drawers.

Norma sums up the problem simply:

“When the movers are tilting the dollies back and maneuvering [a dresser]—to where they have to turn it on its side—all the weight falls to the bottom or toward the tilt, and it causes a high risk for damages. Not just to walls and the floors that we’re traveling through, but also to the actual items that are in the drawers. They could fall to the back, and depending on how delicate it is… It could break; jewelry could tangle and bust in the rails of the drawers… Clothing could tangle and get damaged, as well.” 

—Norma

You might think it’s easier than taking all your clothes out and folding them again later, but that’s only true if there are no damages in the moving process! 

3. Leaving Jewelry or Fragile Items Loose

At 3 Men Movers, our policy is that movers don’t touch things like jewelry which can easily be moved by a client. It’s very easy for jewelry to shift, tangle, or get damaged when moving, so it doesn’t belong in the back of a truck with other heavier items. 

So we recommend that you move jewelry on your own and as delicately as possible. 

Movers will certainly tote jewelry cabinets, but on certain conditions:

  • Cabinets or chests should be emptied to avoid any damage to the jewelry inside
  • Remove jewelry or watches and place them in a lined or wrapped box with a hard exterior that can protect it from heavy pressure or bumps
  • Make sure your jewelry is packed tightly but gently, and that box is sturdy enough to hold up if it gets banged around in your backseat or trunk from driving over a pothole or braking abruptly

4. Using Shrinkwrap or Bubble Wrap For Everything

Shrinkwrap and bubble wrap might be fun to play with, but they’re important supplies for packing your items. 

Norma advises that shrinkwrap should be reserved for:

  1. Movers to tighten their grip on smooth items like furniture and appliances
  2. It’s also good for keeping items protected from dust that often builds up in storage

Bubble wrap should be for ornaments, figurines, thin glass items, or anything prone to chipping, shattering, or breaking. 

5. Using Cheap, Flimsy Boxes & Packing Materials

While it should be everyone’s goal to keep moving expenses down, avoid cheap packing materials at all costs.

Not only are cheap boxes more difficult for movers and packers to work with, but they’ll also slow down your move and can contribute to damages. 

If you’re packing by yourself, make sure you have the right type of boxes

Grocery store boxes might be fine for food, but they definitely won’t stand up to the tough job of moving heavier items.

And, flimsy boxes shouldn’t be used for the big (or expensive) stuff!

Most of the time, the items will end up falling out of the bottom when the box is lifted or getting crushed from above by something heavy.

Your moving job will also take longer if movers have to wrap weak boxes or boxes without proper lids. 

6. Using Bags to Pack Instead of Boxes

Substituting bags for moving boxes definitely won’t protect your items when being transported.

Putting pillows in bags is an exception, but anything that can go in a bag should go in a box. 

Bags also can’t be stacked like moving boxes.

Stacking boxes properly is a best loading practice for movers, partly because it maximizes space and ensures your items don’t bump or fall around in the truck. 

Think your cool compartment bag is an easy fix to transport your wine bottles?

Let’s just say, you don’t want to bump over a pothole and find out what happens to that Pinot. 

Pack Ahead of Time for an Easy, Fast, Damag Move 

Packing before your move can save tons of time and headache, but only if you do it right! 

Follow these tips and you’ll have the smoothest, easiest move ever. Not to mention your movers will adore you for being so well-prepared. 

Why pack yourself when you can hire someone to do it for you?

Our professional packers are skilled at not only packing and wrapping everything you need.

They’ll even throw in free organizing at your new spot!

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Here’s How to Make Moving Somewhere New Less Scary


 

So you want to move somewhere completely new where you don’t have any connections?  

Well, there’s a wrong way and a right way to fulfill your desire of moving somewhere else alone. Below, we break down what you need to know before you go, and why.

Moving to a New City or State? Consider These Things First

The last thing you need is to be afraid or caught off-guard by unexpected challenges. Before you load up a moving truck with everything you own, make sure you investigate everything that will impact your life and happiness in a brand-new city.

If You’ve Never Lived There

Desiring to relocate elsewhere and start over can seem thrilling. But if you’ve never lived there, haven’t even visited, or if you have no family/friends waiting, picturing your new life can conjure dreamy illusions not based in reality. 

To know the real deal, you’ll need to look into things like:

  • Influential cultures/subcultures, politics, or policies. It may not be obvious now, but the general pace, attitudes, and demographics of a new place will have a tremendous impact on your longterm happiness. Plenty of people who are used to a way of life may find it hard to adjust to something new. Whatever preconceived notion you had of the place you want to move to, your new discoveries about it may be super interesting or extremely off-putting. 
  • Climate, weather, and seasonality.  This is crucial if you hate certain weather extremes. Note: climate is general and is defined as “the weather conditions prevailing in an area in general or over a long time period.”  For example, Texas is known for its scorching, humid summers, heavy and sometimes dangerous rainfall, and lack of four distinct seasons. (Unless you count allergy season by itself). People with a strong preference for mild or colder climates or individuals with medical conditions triggered by heat definitely shouldn’t move here on a whim! The same logic applies if you have a severe respiratory disease… You probably should investigate if your desired city has heavy air pollution. 
  • Check transportation routes. When you’re looking for a place to live, transportation is a key factor in getting to a job or important services. No matter if you’re house- or apartment-hunting if you plan on commuting, use Google Maps or Quora to find out where the major traffic areas, interstates, highways, or public transportation routes are. While you’re at it, see what’s nearby in terms of grocery stores, hospitals, urgent care clinics, shopping centers, public facilities, or entertainment. 

 

If You Don’t Already Have a Job 

Not having a job lined up wherever you plan to relocate can make things more difficult, but it’s certainly not an automatic failure. 

If you’re trying to land a gig in your new locale, do this before you move:

  • Check out the local job market. Depending on where you live, some industries have a stronger presence than others. It’s up to you to find out which fields, occupations, and skills are more in-demand in the new place you want to move. Roles for a marine biologist or scuba instructor may not exactly be abundant if you want to move to a landlocked city or state with no coastline or beach. 
  • Build your network online. What skills do you need to work on to get the job you want? Of course, you’ll need to polish your professional presence—resumes, curriculum vitae, portfolios, etc. Get copies of any transcripts, diplomas, or certificates before you move. Then, the hustle begins: Join professional groups or meetups (Facebook is fantastic for this), establish yourself on LinkedIn and post regularly while reaching out to former colleagues, professional acquaintances, and new connections. This will help increase your online visibility to recruiters and employers needing to fill a role. Research job opportunities and apply online directly with the company you’re checking out. Ask anyone you know who lives there to keep an eye out for roles that fit your skillset. It will also help you help others who are looking for new opportunities you come across but don’t want; they will likely appreciate it and return the favor when necessary. Check into larger employers or startups based there because they’ll often have more roles to fill. 
  • Gain a new skill or trade. Trade schools, internet-based certifications, and online courses from colleges and universities have made it easier than ever to develop an existing competency or gain a new skill. If you don’t already have a role in the city you’ve moved to, focus on one of these methods to get the background knowledge for a new job. Also, consider getting a freelance hustle in the gig economy in case you need to temporarily make ends meet. 

If You Have Pets or Children

Ok, so you’re not exactly alone if you’re bringing pets or kids along to a different city or state… However, if you are alone, then you’re definitely the breadwinner. 

Here are some super important things that parents and pet owners should look into before moving somewhere unfamiliar:

For pet parents: Check your residential pet policy.

  • It’s more than just paying pet rent. Some homeowner’s associations (HOAs), many home insurance companies, apartment complexes, and even cities/counties have policies that ban certain animals, including specific dog breeds and mixes. Although there is much controversy over these breed restrictions, certain entities like apartment complexes and rentals, reserve the right to enforce any lease bans on what they deem “aggressive breeds.”
  • Even if you don’t have an aggressive breed as outlined in the contract, another neighbor could. If the thought of it makes you uneasy, it should. Terms of the other tenant’s lease are only known and enforceable by the landlord. So, it’s at their discretion to give them the boot, and you won’t have a say if a dispute arises over an unfriendly pet.
  • Renter’s and homeowner’s insurance companies often have long, arbitrary dog blacklists, too.  Many smaller cities, homeowner associations (HOAs), and apartment complexes have breed restrictions as well. Unfortunately, many people don’t consider this or even ask about pet policies when they move somewhere new.  If your pup is considered a prohibited breed or has a history of biting, you often can’t get renter’s or homeowner’s insurance coverage, so check into this before moving.
  • If your dog is deemed an aggressive breed and harms someone? You’re facing 100% liability for the resulting costs because it won’t be covered by an insurer. You can try to get an exception, have the dog excluded from the policy, or search for another insurer. More exotic pets (like snakes or meat-eating reptiles) are typically excluded from homeowners and renter’s insurance, altogether.

For parents of children: Dig into school district ratings.

  • Education is a crucial part of childhood development. If you have children in primary school, you’ll want to research the best school districts where you’re planning to move and make sure you’re legally zoned to those districts.
  • Find the answers to important questions about the districts and any specific schools you’re eyeing. What are their ratings and why? What are the policies, programs, and track records of the schools? What are students and other parents saying about the school? It will have a big influence on where you choose to live.
  • For those in secondary schools, focus on any interests your kids have that are reflected in the academic or extracurricular activities. For instance, if your daughter is adamant about becoming a pediatrician, look for schools that emphasize science exposure. Getting credit for certain advanced high school-level courses can help offset your child’s college tuition costs later. Depending on any training programs that your child completes, they could possibly graduate high school with a professional certification! Join online parental groups and check local news sources to get the real scoop on the state of childhood education before you move. 

If You’re Single or Simply Don’t Know Anyone

Single? Looking for friends? 

Stop us if this starts to sound like a dating ad, but you’re going to have to work harder to get to know a new place so it’s not so intimidating. 

If you’re moving and don’t know anyone:

  • Read up on the neighborhoods. Most cities are unofficially separated into different neighborhoods. The upscale suburbs, the newly renovated and gentrified areas, urban enclaves, tourist traps, where to get the best shopping, food, business or industrial connections… You name it. If you’re excited to explore a new city, get to know where you want to hang outwhere you want to live, and if you want those two to actually be the same place or separate. Can you handle living around an area with frequent noise? What about the quieter family-oriented suburbs? Do you want your amenities within walking distance or do you prefer to live on the outskirts and see the stars? 
  • Check crime rate & response times. When you’re alone in a new city you don’t know very well, safety should be at the forefront of your decision. This also goes back to the first point: know where your nearest hospitals, ER, and urgent care centers are near your new spot . What’s the average first responder time? What do the crime rate and density look like by neighborhood or zip code? There are lots of deceptively attractive areas you’ll see in the daytime that actually have surprising crime rates. Whether it’s break-ins, burglaries, juvenile mischief, or even violent crime, you need to know before you make the commitment. Get the real deal from real residents using apartment review pages and sites like Nextdoor.com for neighborhoods. 

If You’re Buying a Home There

House-hunting means you’re seriously thinking about settling in a new place. If you’ve never lived there before and never bought a house, you’ll want to look out for these things specifically:

  • What are local and state taxes like? What about insurance? What are the property taxes and insurance rates in your new desired location? Are they higher than what you’re paying now (or more than what you’d be willing to pay)? Don’t stop at digging into the property taxes, but find out if your new destination requires state income taxes, too. 
  • Before closing, check Mother Nature. Are you moving to an area notorious for flooding, earthquakes, wildfires, hurricanes, etc? If you’re eyeing a move to a new place with a reputation for natural disasters, this should be at the top of your FAQs when looking for a new home. Real estate agents should be able to help answer these questions while steering clear of anything that gives you pause. Likewise, it’s best if you’re upfront about your concerns right away.
  • Find the nearest fire department. Not only will this help you save on home insurance costs, but you’ll feel safer knowing that trained firefighters aren’t far away if you ever need them.
  • Locate nearby noise-makers and potential hazards. Unfortunately, some people don’t even think about this until they’re trying to sleep or get to work and a train abruptly and very loudly interrupts them… Or when that nearby airport activity constantly jams up their WiFi and cell phone signals. The dangers of living near an outdoor gun range or an unofficial outdoor shooting practice area are obvious.  Airports, railroads, shooting ranges, etc… these are things to avoid when house-hunting somewhere you’ve never been before. Make sure you notify any realtor you’re working with, too, of these deal-breakers.

Get Ready to Start Over Somewhere New. Fearlessly.

Lots of people find it too intimidating to even consider heading off alone. 

(Meanwhile, other folks do the exact opposite, diving in headfirst to the prospect without planning at all). Both mindsets can end up regretting “what could have been.”

It can seem exciting to move to a place you’ve never lived in. It can also prove challenging if you don’t check out this critical information first. 

Now, you don’t have to let any of that stop you!


20 Questions to Ask Reputable Movers Before Booking


Looking to move? You’ll need to prepare some important questions to ask movers before you hire them and let strangers into your home.   

If you’re seeking a reputable brand that’s safe and efficient, there’s more to it than just scanning the rating and number of reviews, or simply taking the word of a friend, 

While you’re searching around for affordable moving quotes, it’s easy to forget all the questions you should ask. 

That’s why we’ve compiled everything you don’t know that you should be asking a prospective moving company for hire.

Read on for more!

Basics to Know Before Booking A Moving Company 

By the time you’re ready to book movers, you should have 100% clarity on:

  • What services you are and are not getting
  • The professionalism, licensing, and experience of the company and crews entering your home
  • How you’ll be charged
  • When you’ll be charged
  • What you’ll be charged for
  • How much any fees and hourly rates are
  • What to expect on your move day
  • How and who to contact at the company if something goes wrong

Nobody could break this down better than our Moving Experts.

They want to share everything you’re not asking moving companies but should be.  Not only will they help you find the right moving service, but any honest and reputable company should be able to answer them all.  

 

Questions to Ask Movers About Their Credentials & Crews 

  1. How much experience do you have with moving?
  2. Are you licensed to move with the U.S. Department of Transportation and your state DMV? What are your licensing numbers?
  3. Do your movers and packers have training or prior experience?
  4. Did your movers and packers pass a criminal background check? Are checks done consistently?
  5. Do you regularly drug screen your movers?
  6. Do your teams know how to properly move or pack/unpack my special items?

Make sure that questions about security are the first things you ask a prospective moving company. 

Larger companies will have a lot more crews to choose from, so you should be able to get a crew that can accommodate your needs the best. 

Unfortunately, lots of people prioritize pricing over quality when looking for movers.

Sure, a quick Google search of something like “cheap movers” or “cheap moving companies” will generate plenty of results… 

While it’s good to be mindful of your spending, you won’t know what you’re really getting for that low price tag until you dig deeper. 

Moving experts, Omar, Carlos and Felicia, agree that people often don’t factor in security when finding a crew to enter their home.

“A lot of companies use day laborers,” Carlos states. “Day laborers could be anybody…”

“Do you really want anybody in your home? So, you want to make sure that the movers that are being used are background-checked, drug-screened professionals… because anybody can move a box, but not everybody can move.” 

Felicia agrees that security should be at the top of the list no matter if you live alone, if you own expensive items, or if you have a family with young children. 

“Think about it…” she starts, “someone comes to your house and they’re day laborers. They don’t have a background check. You don’t know where they’ve come from. You know, they have your address, and they can always come back.” 

You’ll absolutely need to ask this question if you have fragile, expensive, or sentimental items.  Let’s face it, not everyone can gracefully move a baby grand piano, a gun safe, alcohol, glass tables, or a rare collection.   

Legally, the U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT) and the state of Texas both require movers to be licensed in order to operate.

However, most customers don’t realize that this is not regulated, so not all moving companies are actually licensed and registered with the Texas Department of Motor Vehicles (TxDMV).

Before doing business with any moving company, ask for their USDOT number and TxDMV number and check it online

These licensing numbers should be posted on their website and in any quote emails they send you. 

If they don’t have one, forget them. There are plenty of other trustworthy and legally compliant companies out there!  

Omar says, “One thing [customers] always forget to ask… make sure that the guys are licensed professionals, that they’ve been around for a while, they know what they’re doing, they have their reputation…. Definitely want to check customer reviews, make sure it’s a good company, make sure it’s a reputable company that you’re going to be going with.”

Questions to Ask Movers About Their Policies, Services, & Fees

  1. What do you charge for on a move? Is there a fee for rescheduling or canceling a move?
  2. How much is each charge and how are they calculated?
  3. What does your travel fee include? Is it hourly? Does it include the drive time to and from my destinations?
  4. How do you verify the start, stop, and any non-work times for your crews?
  5. Will you do a virtual or in-person walk-through?
  6. Can your movers donate or remove furniture I don’t want after a move?
  7. Do you offer packing and unpacking services? What does this include?
  8. Will I be charged for certain supplies? If so, how much?
  9. Is there anything your company will not move?
  10. Is assembly/disassembly of furniture included? Are there types of furniture you won’t re-assemble?
  11. Will all my belongings fit in your truck for 1 trip? What truck sizes do you offer?
  12. What’s your claims rate and process if there are damages?
  13. Is the tip included? When and how can I leave a tip?
  14. Who do I contact if I have a problem during my move?

Make sure you ask lots of questions when getting moving quotes from different companies.

Ask about their state and national licensing to move, what they can and cannot move, how they calculate fees, and who to contact if things go wrong.

“Make sure they disassemble; because, a lot of times we don’t know how to take beds apart, or furniture,” Felicia says, mindfully. “A lot of companies don’t disassemble at all. That’s a good thing to ask. Don’t assume they do, because a lot of them don’t.

Felicia recommends you also ask lots of questions about the company’s fee system and policies. This way, you won’t get slapped with sky-high charges when the company promised an inexpensive travel fee upfront.

“A lot of times they’ll give you a price based on the hourly rate and the trip charge, and you think that’s a good price because it’s pretty cheap or reasonable. But, guess what? They hit you at the end when you’re coming back,” Felicia explains.

Exorbitant fees can also sneak in when movers charge fuel or hourly trip fees in areas with horrible traffic...meaning you’ll pay for the time it takes them to drive in rush-hour traffic. 

In your quote, (which you need to get in writing) there should be a clear breakdown of the services you’re getting and the cost for each one. 

A representative for the moving company should be able to easily give you definitions of each service and what each fee involves when you ask. 

MASTER TIP: Due to widespread illness and anxiety about the coronavirus outbreak, the company’s COVID-19 policiesclaim, cancellation, and rescheduling processes should be clearly outlined and flexible. 

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Escaping Domestic Violence? Here’s How to Move Out Safely.


For victims of domestic violence, the COVID-19 pandemic presents another obstacle when trying to leave toxic situations and move out.

With stay-at-home orders, job losses, financial and emotional hardships, and lack of resources or support, moving out and escaping an abuser unharmed can seem like an intimidating effort.

“What we do know is that because of COVID-19 there has been a dramatic increase in domestic violence1, not only in our county but around the world. We also know that most of the area shelters are full and because of the epidemic are not accepting new clients, so it is a particularly dangerous time for victims who are still with their abusers.”

Peggy Wright, Director of Sexual Assault & Counseling Programs at Fort Bend Women’s Center

If you’re experiencing domestic violence and need to leave quickly, you may be too anxious or frightened to hash out the details.

So, below is a plan to follow. If you don't have time to do everything on this list—that's okay. Oftentimes, people escaping abuse don't have days or weeks to plan.

Pick out what works for your situation and do whatever you can do to stay safe.

If abuse has escalated to the point that you fear for your life or that of any children in the house, please call 9-1-1.

Read on to see moving tips for those escaping domestic violence, and download the moving safety guide designed to help abuse survivors plan a safe relocation.


Before Moving: Plan Your Exit

If you live with an abuser, you may not feel you have the courage to move out yet. 

And that’s okay

Even before you’re ready to take that first step, planning is critical.  Doing it early—even if you're not prepared to leave as soon as possible—will boost your chances of success.

Here are some tips from movers and our friends at Fort Bend Women’s Center:

  • Set aside money when you can. Shelters offer services free of charge. It’s still a great idea to have your own money to access depending on how you are moving out and your post-move plans.
  • Things will be easier if you have money to access independently. Try setting up a checking or savings account in your own name at a bank that is separate from your partner. 

Gather your most important and valuable items.

It doesn’t have to be all at once, but set aside what you can, whenever you can.  (Examples: extra car keys, car title/lease paperwork, emergency cash, insurance cards, birth/marriage certificates, social security cards, health records, extra medications, debit/credit cards, extra clothes, children’s clothing or supplies, any evidence of physical abuse— like photos, journals, notes, medical or police records, etc.). 

  • Store them in a private place. Private, as in, ONLY you have access to it. Do not leave this with anyone close to your abuser or any place where your abuser could easily find it. (Examples: a personal lockbox, a backpack, with a trusted friend or family member, or in a safety deposit box in a bank your abuser doesn’t know about). 
  • Make copies of any documents your abuser is likely to notice are missing.

Create a code word, phrase, or signal.

If you have children or other loved ones living with you and your abuser, they need to know exactly what to do when you say this.

Also do this with any trusted friends, family, or neighbors you can call on stay with or help you leave.

(Examples of a plan: Go to a neighbor’s home, ask your school staff to call/text me, call grandma). 

In case you’re in a situation where your abuser is closely monitoring your every move, or listening, create a code term that sounds natural but is unique to you and your loved ones.

You should also practice what to do in case of danger—especially if you have kids. 

If possible, get your own cell phone.

The chance that an abuser has secretly installed a surveillance app on their victim’s phone is extremely high. Many IPS (intimate partner surveillance) apps can be installed without even touching a cell phone.

According to MIT’s Technology Review, one survivor even recounts how opening a photo texted from her ex-boyfriend gave him total access to her cellphone—including her apps, current location, emails, passwords, camera, and even social media accounts.

If you can get your own phone, use a passcode that can’t be easily guessed.

How to safely handle a cell phone to plan your move:

  1. DO NOT ditch the compromised phone, (this could enrage the abuser). Use it for simple tasks, but do not use it to call/ search for movers or domestic abuse resources.
  2. Suspect you’re being spied on? Don’t bother paying for anti-spyware apps since most can’t find all the creepy software, and the abuser could react violently. The only way to remove it is to factory reset the phone, and that will remove all your current apps and settings. It’s best to get a cheap phone that allows you to privately text, browse the internet, plan your move, and make calls to police or family violence centers. 

Can’t get your own cell phone?

Keep the Fort Bend Women’s Center hotline number handy: 281-342-4357. They suggest “saving it under something innocent like the name of a restaurant [or business] you like."

To plan your move from an abusive situation:

  1. Use a public computer at a library, school, or friend’s house. If you know where you’ll be moving, set up mail forwarding through your local United States Post Office, or do it online for $1.05. If you don’t know exactly where you’re going, you can get help from a shelter when you’re there. (Log out of all services and clear your history when you’re done.)
  2. Research how you’ll move. Will another trusted adult be helping you move? Will you hire a moving company instead? Make sure that whatever company you choose has domestic violence policies in place (what we call “privacy moves”), and that the movers have undergone criminal background checks. We call these “privacy moves” because we take every precaution to protect your privacy—which is vital in cases of abuse. No one who calls will be able to discuss details of the move just by using your name. In fact, you’ll be issued a personal file locator number so only you can review the move information. 
  3. Know your options: call shelters in advance.  This is important to learn the policies about whom they allow to stay or visit. Even if there isn’t room, a shelter can often refer you to another place. Hotels are often used to house people escaping abuse when centers are full, and staff members will assist with meals, health care, child care, pet care, education, job training, counseling, waivers for utilities and phone service, legal help, longer-term shelter, and more. 
  4. Shelters may be able to help you with pets.  Take any evidence you gathered previously, (like photos or medical records of abuse). Besides legal help, you’ll also want to ask if the shelter is pet-friendly. Typically, service and support animals are welcome. If not, you can leave your pet with a trusted friend or family member out of the abuser’s reach in case (s)he tries to retaliate. Shelters may also be able to connect you with resources on fostering your pet if necessary. Fort Bend Women's Center, for example, has connections with the Houston Humane Society and can help make arrangements for fostering or sheltering pets.
  5. Determine the best time to leave. If you live with your partner, ask yourself: when do they go to work or leave the home for extended periods of time? Are there any rooms you feel safe in that you can exit from in case you have to move quickly? If you don’t live with your partner, consider: When is the best time for you to be alone or have privacy?

Avoid posting or messaging anything on social media about your plan.

You’ll need to memorize important information, like phone numbers or addresses of trusted neighbors, friends, or family.

If you have children, tell them to memorize it too. Agree on a code word/phrase that will let everyone involved know what to do when it is used

Consider free private security.

There are some nonprofits that help domestic abuse victims move by standing watch in case an abuser shows up unannounced. One organization, called Reynolds Protection, is right here in Dallas, Texas!


On Move Day: Time is of the Essence

When survivors of violence leave their abusers, it can be a dangerous time. But you are strong enough to make it out! These steps will help make it easier on the day of your move. 

Confirm the details with your movers & others

Whether you’re hiring pros or supporters to help you move—or getting out by yourself—review how you want your move to work. Go over your code words and escape plan with children or people who are helping you move. Use a public computer (like at a library or at most shipping stores) to print out the destination in case your phone is being spied on. 

Make sure your essentials are ready to go.

In a hurry? Grab the essentials that you packed previously and go. Remember those copies you made? Leave them in case you have little to no belongings to move and don’t want your abuser to quickly catch on that you’ve left.

What to do if you don’t have boxes (or the money to buy them)

Ask your local grocery store. These boxes will probably be somewhat worn or less sturdy (and you may be able to only use them once), but grocery store boxes are a good fix if you have no money.

Your moving company can also provide these—especially if they have packing services.

Lock up anything that could be used as a weapon.

Make sure these items are as hard to reach as possible. (Example: Put things like guns, knives, or bats in a safe, on top of kitchen cabinets, or in a toilet water tank.)

Also, review where your exits and windows are located in case you have to run to another room.

Know your end destination.

Will you be leaving unexpectedly? Where will you go and how will you get there? Have your printed directions ready—especially if you think your cell phone is being used to spy on you.

If you have children at school and can't pick them up before moving...

Ask the front office to change release privileges so an abusive partner cannot pick them up after finding out you have left.

Sometimes when abusers feel they have lost control, they may try to lash out and retaliate by hurting your loved ones. Do this on the same day and time you’re planning to leave home you share with your abuser.

Ditch the compromised cell phone.

Remember: it’s highly likely that your abuser is spying on your location and whatever info passes to or from your phone.

Once you are safely on your way to your destination, that is the time to ditch your current phone or do a factory reset.

But first, log out of every online and app account you own so they can't access your location through your app and online account permissions.

NOTE: Things to know before doing a factory reset on your phone.

Resetting your phone will remove your current apps and settings, so you’ll have to download and log into them again.

Some apps you should avoid downloading again (like certain email apps) and only access them through a computer.

Update each account password and its security questions.

Change your passwords to something the abuser can’t guess. Do this for your email account first, because social media and other apps will often send location info to your email to authorize any changes.

Unable to discard the compromised phone?

Disable your Bluetooth, Bluetooth scanning, and location so your phone cannot communicate with other devices.

This is usually called Location Sharing in your Settings or menu bar.

Look in Settings to ensure Bluetooth scanning is disabled, as apps can use it to share your location even if you have Bluetooth turned off.

Check each application in your privacy and security settings to ensure suspicious-looking apps cannot access and share your information.

Download Google Voice, a free service that generates a virtual phone number for you to make and screen calls or texts.

Ensure that no one can make changes to your wireless service.

If you are the account holder for your wireless service, call and ask them to put additional security measures in place, or change your verbal PIN.

If you are setting up a new service, inform them of your situation as many providers will waive fees.

Have your personal phone easily available & set up Emergency SOS.

Moving out due to domestic violence can be scary, so it’s necessary to be prepared. Using the SOS feature is easy and will call the police first, then alert your emergency contacts in case you are in danger.

NOTE: In case of danger, use your Emergency SOS buttons or call 9-1-1 .

Use the secret code/phrase/signal with any children or people who are helping you move. Do not run to where your children or loved ones are, in case your partner tries to hurt them. If you must go to another room, make sure it has an exit.

What to do if your abuser shows up unexpectedly.

Your abuser may already be home when your friends/movers arrive— so it's important that your helpers are prepared. For movers, this means acting on their privacy move policies.

Example: at 3 Men Movers, this includes appearing as if they have the wrong house.

For children or supporters helping you move, this means acting on your emergency code word plan or calling 9-1-1 in case your partner becomes threatening or violent. 

Disable anything that could be used to track you during a move.

Moving out is an extremely sensitive and nerve-wracking process if you're dealing with abuse from an intimate partner. That's why it's critical to make your move-out as streamlined and private as possible. 

It's common for abusive partners to exert control by tracking you without you even knowing it. 

In fact, Bluetooth-enabled devices that were originally created to find lost items are being leveraged for stalking unsuspecting victims. 

Devices like Apple AirTags can be stealthily slipped into a bag or attached on a car and track everywhere you go. 

So not only should you check your vehicle and other belongings for trackers, it's also a good idea to turn off any GPS navigation in your car, and disable the location-tracking features on your smartphone. 

Be aware that if you have an iPhone, it can take anywhere between 8 to 24 hours before an AirTag will alert you to its presence.

That means you'll need to plan a specific time to check your belongings for tracking devices before moving out. 

Below are apps that can help you find out if you're being tracked by an unknown device:

Reach out to your safe place.

Wherever you’re going—be it a shelter or a loved one’s home—reach out first. See if they can provide you with any help or transportation to your destination.


After Moving: Protect Your Future

Follow these post-move privacy tips to embark on a new, brighter future and stay safe. 

Get & keep copies of your protective order

Depending on their funding and access to lawyers, shelter or domestic violence attorney may be able to connect you with a family violence attorney or help you fill out paperwork—but you may have to persistently check on the status.

Children and pets can be included in these orders, too.

Carry a certified copy of the protective order with you everywhere you go. Addresses may be on these documents or police reports, so consider using a P.O. box or a friend’s address for your mail.

Be careful who and where you submit your new phone number and address. 

Ask for service deposit waivers.

Getting a break for a while will help you gain financial independence and avoid returning to toxic partners who make you feel like you can’t succeed without them. 

In Texas, the deposit for utilities (like gas, electricity, and wireless/phone service) can be waived or reduced to a monthly basis.

The requirements include getting a letter signed by Certifying Entity and faxing it to the utility company (you can use faxes at any shipping/postal store).

According to the Public Utility Commission of Texas, entities that can sign utility waivers are

      1. Family violence centers
      2. Treating medical staff
      3. Law enforcement personnel
      4. Office of Texas District or County Attorney
      5. Office of the Attorney General
      6. Grantees of the Texas Equal Access to Justice Foundation 

 Change up your routine.

If you take the same route to/from work, take a different route.

Avoid going to the places your abuser knows. If you normally work or shop at night, try switching to the daytime. The most vulnerable time for survivors is when they leave and the abusive partner has lost control.

Ensure your abuser can’t predict where you’re going. This will be easier if you’re moving a lengthy distance from where your abuser lives.

Notify your workplace.

You just did an incredibly brave thing by choosing a better future! Someone else’s choices shouldn’t change that. Give a photo of the abuser to your work supervisors, security staff, or coworkers that you trust and work closely with at the same time.

They don’t have to know the details, but they should be aware that (s)he isn’t allowed near the premises to harass, stalk, or threaten you via a protective/restraining order.

You can also alert authorities at your children’s school, even if you changed their schools

Unlist your new phone number.

Lockdown new emails or social accounts. It’s common for abusers to show lots of remorse or even cry in order to get back into your life.

This is a manipulative tactic to regain control, and they may also try this through mutual friends or family. Unfortunately, you’ll have to make some changes to avoid caving to pressure.

  1. First, set up two-factor authentication (this is available on almost all Internet-based accounts).
  2. Next, do a social media cleanse, like blocking your abuser and their friends, not allowing yourself to be tagged in photos without review, not sharing any location tags/check-ins, etc. so they cannot see where you now live. If you share mutual custody of children, it’s more complicated. Shelters can connect you with a family violence attorney who can assist you further. Call your wireless company and ask to change or unlist your new phone number.

Read the Fine Print in New Contracts, Service Agreements, & Privacy Policies.

Finally, avoid doing business with companies who state in their Privacy Policies that your personal information might be sold for marketing purposes. 

Set up security in your new space.

Pick security systems (like cameras and alarms) with motion-sensitive lighting and backup that won’t fail in bad weather or can’t work without WiFi.

You’ll also want to make sure a simple laser cannot disable them.

Security system companies may also be able to help you settle in with discounts or a monthly waiver. For this, you may be asked to furnish some proof, so consult with your attorney or ask the company what you need to provide.

Replace wooden doors with steel or metal doors.

Secure windows, garages, locks, and doors with security bars or locks so they can’t be opened or kicked in from the outside.


How Survivors Can Get Help For Domestic Violence

If you or someone you know is in an abusive situation and needs help, please contact the following:

 


How To Prepare for Full-Service Movers in San Antonio?


Being a professional mover in San Antonio is hard work! It’s a lot of physical activity including lifting, carrying, and even walking up and down stairs multiple times with heavy boxes and furniture. Our professional, experienced San Antonio movers work in the dog days of summer, and even in the rain. There are a few things you can do as a customer to help your San Antonio moving company out on moving day!

Ways To Help Your Movers:

  • Be Packed and Ready to Go When They Arrive. This helps both you and your movers. This ensures that your local movers can go as quickly as possible! Being fully packed means no loose items and is one of the top things you can do to make your move easier.
  • Reserve Parking in Front of Your House or Apartment Complex. You can use your own vehicles to block the space until we arrive
  • Make Sure Walkways Are Clear Where the Movers Will Be Walking. This saves everyone time and avoids any stumbling
  • Same Goes With Pets. We love pets, but make sure pets are secured and out of the way so they don’t get out or get stressed with the unknown visitors in their space! Read our tips for moving with pets.
  • Disconnect Washers and Dryers Before We Arrive. This also saves you time and inconvenience! We want to move your washer and dryer (really!) but we are not supposed to disconnect them ourselves because we are not plumbers and don’t want to cause any damage to water lines!
  • Offering Them Water. Moving is hard work so a refreshing beverage is always appreciated!
  • Let Them Do What Professional Movers Do. As hard as that might be, our movers are experienced professionals so stand back and let them do what they do best!
  • Labeling Your Boxes. This helps us know where things go in the new place so your move can go by quickly and you’ll have everything in the convenient spot you need it! Label things as FRAGILE too just so we know to take extra special care of it. Make sure you tell us that everything is labelled in advance so we know to look for it!
  • Tell Us the Fastest Driving Route. We use our GPS to get from your old home to the new home so if you know of a better way that our trucks can safely take, please let us know !
  • Try to Relax! You are in great hands with a San Antonio moving company like 3 Men Movers!

When Is The Best Time To Move in Dallas?


If you have a move in Dallas approaching in the near future, you are probably in the process of packing, looking for Dallas moving companies, and deciding on the right time to move. How do you decide which day and what time is best? As experienced Dallas movers, we came up with a few things to consider when deciding the best time to move:

Pricing for Dallas movers

Rates for Dallas moving companies may fluctuate. Some Dallas movers may offer higher rates on weekends because that is prime time for moving. People that work during the week or have kids in school usually prefer to move on weekends so they aren’t having to take time off work. If you have the flexibility to move on a weekday, this might be the best option for you and a way to save money.

Time of Day to Schedule Dallas movers

At 3 Men Movers, we offer 2 time slots for moving:

-Morning moves: This moving time slot gives you an exact time you can expect your crew to arrive and get started. This is the best time slot for you if you are on a strict schedule to be out by a certain time, you have a long way to travel, or just if you are an early riser!

-Flex moves: This moving time slot has more uncertainty. Since our movers usually do two moves a day, we can’t tell you an exact time your Dallas movers will arrive for the Flex move. They will contact you when they are finished with the first move and give you an ETA. It is 100% dependent on how long that first move takes. You can read more information about a Flex move here. This works best if you have more flexibility with your schedule AND especially if you still have packing to do.

 

When You Have to Be Out

This is a personal choice based on how much time you need and the availability of your schedule. If you are renting and your lease is up on the same day your Dallas movers are coming, you need to make sure you will have time to clean/fix anything necessary to get your deposit back before you turn the keys in. There also tends to be a rush of people moving toward the end and very beginning days of the month, so if you know you'll need to move then, book your Dallas moving company early so they aren't sold out!

Next Step

Knowing all of this, plan your Dallas move based on what works for you! When you are ready to decide, you can book us online and we will be happy to help make your moving day a stress-free one!


Decluttering Your House: How to Get Rid of Things You No Longer Want in Austin


If some days you look around and realize your house is too cluttered, you're not alone. We all have things we just don't use anymore, and yet we allow them to continue to sit in our house, closet, or garage, day in and day out, simply taking up space. You know that treadmill you haven't turned on since 2002 and now just acts as a clothes rack? Or maybe that outfit you bought three years ago but still haven't found an occasion to wear it? Well, how about setting aside some time in the next month and getting rid of that stuff once and for all? It will give you more space, and it will feel great to finally get rid of it! And if you plan on moving soon, think about how much easier your move will go when you have fewer things for your Austin movers to load up and transport. Here's how to get started on getting rid of items you don't need.

Keep It in the Family (or At Least Within Your Circle of Friends)

Maybe you've finally come to terms with the fact that you're probably not ever going to step on that treadmill again…but your sister--who has been trying to get in shape--just might! After all, one person's "trash" is another person's treasure.

So as you go through the things you don't want, think about friends and family members who might be able to use some of them. Maybe you have a perfectly good set of pots and pans you never cook with, and your best friend--who's just getting into cooking more lately--would love them.

Or perhaps your son's old clothes would be perfect for your neighbor's younger son. Whether you donate your unwanted items to friends and family or sell them at a super low price, keeping them within your circle is a great way to help out loved ones while getting rid of things you no longer need.

Make Some Money While Downsizing

If no one you know wants your belongings, another option is to sell them. Among the easiest ways to do this is to take pictures and put them on Facebook Marketplace, or any local Austin Facebook groups that let members buy and sell. In fact, there are a few groups that are specifically for buying and selling in the Austin area. Similarly, you can post your items for sale on sites like eBay or Craigslist.

If you prefer to sell your items in person rather than online, consider going to a local resale store. For example, you can get money for your used clothing, shoes, purses and accessories at the Plato's Closet in South Austin.

If you have furniture or household items to sell, head to consignment stores that take these items. Design with Consignment is one example of this kind of store in Austin. This way, you get your unwanted belongings off your hands--making more room in your home--and you make a little money at the same time!

As nice as it is to make some extra cash when downsizing, it's not always a practical endeavor. Maybe you don't have time to take pictures and write a description for every item you have so you can sell online, and you don't want to spend your Saturday at the local consignment store. In this case, donating is a good idea.

In fact, since donations are usually tax-deductible, this tactic can be just as profitable as selling your stuff, especially if you usually owe at tax time. So head to the Austin Goodwill or Salvation Army to make your donations as you downsize. Most locations can even pick up your items if you can't transport them yourself.

You can also donate gently used professional attire to Dress for Success, as they're often looking for free clothes, shoes, and other accessories. This way, you know you're helping a good cause while making more room in your home.

Throw Out Old Items

You know that saying, "when in doubt, throw it out?" Well, it applies here! If you know you don't use it, and no one you know want wants or needs it, it's probably time to just throw it away.

This is particularly true of stained or torn clothing and shoes, ripped up furniture and broken household appliances. If you're having trouble getting rid of items you want to throw out, you can contact LoadUp in Austin to come pick up your junk.

Following these tips can help you get rid of anything you don't need in your house. And if the reason you're trying to declutter is that you plan on moving in Austin soon, contact us to schedule Austin movers to come help you from start to finish on moving day!