How Much It Really Costs to Furnish Your First Apartment


Furnishing your apartment can be both amazing and nerve-wracking—especially when you’re trying to keep costs relatively low.

So where do you start?

What is it that you do and don’t need to be comfy in your new space?

How do you stay within your budget and on-trend?

Regardless of whether it’s your first or your fifth apartment, as movers, we realize that everyone’s furniture needs will differ depending on the reasons for moving.

So no, this isn’t a one-size-fits-all guide to furnishing your new apartment, because we know that your lifestyle needs are unique.

Even better: this Spruce Your Space post will help you create a plan and better understand the costs involved for every piece of your essential apartment furniture budget.

Table of Contents
 
 
 

 

How to Easily Furnish Your Apartment: Here’s What You Actually Need

Sure you’ll need a toolset (with a hammer, nails, drill, and screwdriver), but that’s a given. 

Here’s everything you may or may not have thought about getting in your new apartment—including what you do and don’t need right away.

 Basics: What You Absolutely Need to Settle In

Not only will you feel incomplete without these pieces of furniture in your apartment, but you may be in a bind. 

(After all, where the heck are you supposed to eat if you don’t have any seating or a table?) 

Here are the definite must-haves you’ll need in your new apartment:

  • At least one table (for eating/sitting)
  • At least two chairs 
  • At least 1 lamp each for living room & bedroom (in case of poor lighting)
  • Television (only if you watch TV)
  • TV stand (if you have a TV)
  • Sleeper sofa, loveseat, or sectional (depending on your living room space)
  • At least 1 nightstand
  • Clothing dresser
  • Standing wardrobe closet or rack (for lofts or studios)
  • Extension cords (handy for adding flexible lighting or electronics)
  • Bed frame (possibly with a box spring)
  • Clothing hangers
  • Mattress + pillows
  • Bedding with duvet/comforter + pillowcases
  • Extra bathroom storage drawers (especially if you have roommates or lack linen space)
  • Pots & pans
  • Cutlery 
  • Cooking utensils (measuring cups, tongs, spatulas, etc.)
  • Food storage containers
  • Kitchen dish towels & cleaning cloths
  • Cleaning tools & disinfectants for kitchen & bathroom
  • 2 trash cans (one each for your bathroom & kitchen)
  • Dishes, glasses & flatware
  • A dish rack (if you don’t have a dishwasher)
  • A microwave (if it’s not included)
  • Shower curtain + liner
  • Washcloths
  • Hand towels + bath towels

 

Nice-to-Haves: What You Can Splurge on Now or Get a Bit Later

No, you don’t have to have these items as soon as you move in… But, they’ll instantly make you feel more comfortable and right at home. 

When the timing is perfect for you and your budget, you’ll want to grab these pieces to completely furnish your apartment:

  • Vacuum cleaner
  • Broom + dustpan
  • Barstools or extra chairs for a kitchen/dining area 
  • Oven mitts
  • Paper towel stand
  • Mixing bowls
  • Kitchen rug (memory foam or flat-weave)
  • Extra kitchen storage (baskets, under-cabinet shelves, and racks, etc.)
  • Curtains (nice, but not essential since most units already have blinds)
  • Coffee table
  • Living room area rug
  • 1-2 accent chairs (ya’ know, for company)
  • Working desk + chair
  • Bookshelf/storage
  • End tables (at least 2 for living room)
  • TV entertainment center (the kind with storage shelves)
  • 4 lamps (2 table lamps/1 floor lamp for the living room and 2 for your bedroom nightstands)
  • Floor-length mirror (once you have one, you’ll never go back)
  • 2 nightstands (if you want storage or lamps on both sides of your bed)
  • Bathroom caddy for toiletries, toothbrushes, etc.
  • Bathroom mats (memory foam is the best)
  • Balcony/patio furniture
  • LED lightbulb replacements (to save on your electricity bill)
  • Home décor & wall art 

 

How to Know What You’ll Spend on Apartment Furniture

It will cost the average person anywhere between $2,930 to over $5,000 to fully furnish an apartment with just the basics, even for first-timers—according to design & furniture brand, Furnishr.com.

And that’s not even saying much about the quality or longevity of your chosen furniture!

Figuring out how much you can expect to spend on furnishing your apartment is actually very personal

In fact, your apartment budget largely depends on several factors:

  • Your style preferences. Champagne taste? That means you’ll have to get creative—and zero in on furniture sales or consignment shops.
  • Your budget. This is—regardless of your style—what you can actually afford without racking up credit card debt.  
  • What you need + Where you’ll buy it. Already have furniture and only need certain pieces? You can snag discounted items from IKEA, HomeGoods, Ross or TJ Maxx. But, starting from scratch means you’ll need a lot more, so consider direct-to-consumer companies that will save you money by nixing the middleman. 
  • How long you’ll live in your apartment. Unlike temporary stays, long-term living means you’ll need to invest in better pieces to be comfortable. No matter your budget or length of your lease, stick with furniture that makes you feel cozy. 
  • The size of your apartment. You can’t fit as much furniture in a studio or loft as a 1-2 bedroom apartment. The smaller your apartment is, the more multifunctional furniture you’ll need to maximize limited space.
  • Whether you have children or dependents. If the person you’re living with is financially dependent on you (like a child) you may be responsible for at least some of their furniture—if not all of it. That’s something else you’ll need to factor in when budgeting for bedroom furniture or bathroom storage & linens.

 

6 Places You Can Shop to Buy Everything for Your New Apartment

As shocking as it seems, Target isn’t the top place most people turn to furnish their household. 

According to Statista, the top-ranked furniture retailers since 2019 are:

  1. Ashley HomeStore
  2. Amazon 
  3. IKEA
  4. Williams-Sonoma (its furniture subsidiaries are: Williams-Sonoma Home, West Elm, & Pottery Barn)
  5. Wayfair

Naturally, the top furniture retailers are going to be the most competitive in pricing and price-matching.

And that’s a good thing for you!

Price-matching and comparison-shopping are 2 key methods to help you stay on budget when furnishing your apartment. 

BUT, you’ll still want to save as much money as possible for your other moving expenses. Buying items in sets will really help you stay on track.

In our apartment furnishing breakdown, we’ll go room-by-room and factor in a lot of furniture sets to help your budget.

 

What Can You Expect to Spend on Essential Furniture for an Apartment? Here’s a Room-by-Room Breakdown!

Now that you’re clear on the basics and nice-to-haves you’ll need in your apartment, how much can you expect to spend?  

Next, let’s compare prices for essential apartment furnishings between 2 of these popular stores, plus a trusty favorite:

  • Overstock- an enormous marketplace that basically throws sale alerts and discounts at you (in a good way.)
  • Wayfair- seems like every Instagram home decor influencer has this retailer as a favorite for furniture & home décor.
  • Ashley HomeStore- they’re everywhere and great for shopping in person. 

To be mindful of your budget, we’ll focus on sets, which help you maximize your time and your money. 

By the end, you’ll have a better idea of what you can expect to spend and how to set your budget accordingly.

Before we breakdown the cost to furnish each room of your apartment from these 3 stores, let’s note a few things:

  1. This is NOT an endorsement nor review of any of these products. We haven’t tried them and they’re for illustrative purposes only.    
  2. Prices are accurate at the time of publishing this piece. And, they don’t include taxes. You can definitely find these items or alternatives for less or more, depending on when you shop and if you have a discount code. Based on that, please take these numbers as pre-tax estimates.
  3. Discounts will lower these totals, but the prices below do not include extra discounts. We ABSOLUTELY encourage you to sign up on these sites’ email/ text lists and social media pages to catch great offers and coupon codes!
  4. We tried balancing the furniture picks evenly between the following factors: a substantial number of great reviews/ratings, reasonable price points, or multi-piece sets to maximize your apartment furnishing budget. So while some pieces may not be the cheapest, they have higher rates of customer satisfaction.

 

Kitchen + Dining Area Essentials 

These days, most apartment kitchens have appliances like dishwashers, microwaves, and refrigerators (and of course, a stove). Luckily, you’ll often only have to worry about buying your cooking utensils and seating. 

Many apartments may or may not have an available kitchen island that can double as bar seating. If that’s the case, you don’t necessarily need a table (unless you just want one.) 

Regardless of whether you have a kitchen bar, some places actually have space for a dining table, while others won’t. 

If your place lacks a bar or island, you’ll definitely need a table with chairs—but not necessarily one that’s big enough for a traditional dining room in a house.  

Look out for dining sets, which include the tables and the chairs, or at least a pair of dining chairs sold together. 

For smaller apartments that barely have a distinct dining area, check out bistro-style table sets that are small, circular, and usually include 2 chairs. You’ll maximize your budget this way, even if it seems like a lot upfront.

  Overstock Ashley HomeStore Wayfair
Dining table set $516.37 (5 pcs.) $479.99 (5 pcs. + storage) $649.99 (5 pcs.)
Dishware $83.99 (16 pcs. serves 4) $91.99 (16 pcs. serves 4) $59.99 (12 pcs. serves 4)
Flatware/Silverware $51.49 (40 pcs.) $73.99 (20 pcs.) $29.99 (16 pcs.)
Glassware $24.99 (16 pcs.) $55.99 (6 pcs., for adult beverages or water) $29.99 (16 pcs.)
Food storage containers $35.99 (24 pcs.) $27.99 (14 pcs.) $41.50 (10 pcs.)
Pots & pans $159.95 (11 pcs.) $112.99 (12 pcs + cooking tools) $199.99 (20 pcs. + bakeware)
Basic cooking utensils $39.99 (24 pcs.) $27.99 (6 pcs.) $49.99 (12 pcs.)
Knives/Cutlery $79.00 (13 pcs.) $29.99 (10 pcs. + cutting board) $101.90 (12 pcs. + block)
Garbage can $134.99 (13 gal. & 2.5 gal., touchless, odor control. Use 2.5 gal for your bathroom!) $80.99 (30L & 3L; use the 3L for your bathroom!) $53.99 (30L & 8 gal.; use the 8 gal size for your bathroom!)
Totals $1,086.77 $953.92 $1,221.59
Total cost to furnish apartment kitchen

Living Room Essentials

The furniture you’ll need in the living room area will vary depending on the layout of your apartment, but be prepared to spend $$$ if you want it to look nice and cozy.

For example, studio and loft-style apartments lack a defined sleeping space. 

If you’re moving into one of these, you’ll probably want more flexible options like a sleeper sofa, or a loveseat plus a room divider to section off your bed for privacy. 

In these cases of limited space, having a lift-top coffee table is ideal so your living room can double as an instant workspace or eating spot. 

Have a roomier apartment with a bigger living room?

You can play around with more traditional-style coffee tables. Or, consider getting an ottoman that offers a place to kick up your feet or extra hidden storage.

If you’re the type who can live without end tables (or simply don’t have the room) then save your money. 

However, if you like the idea of having extra space for a drink or décor, then look into coffee table set that includes two side tables. You’ll get what you want at the most bang for your buck.

Sounds bonkers, but, A LOT of people are ditching TV in favor of their smart devices.  

TV prices can also vary wildly depending on various factors and highly personal reasons. For these reasons, we didn’t include a ballpark cost for buying a television. 

But, we did include the cost for purchasing an entertainment center or TV console. 

Regardless of what kind of TV you buy, you’ll need a place to store it. Mostly because it’s a major headache to try and mount a TV in an apartment on your own. 

Plus, it may not be allowed. And who wants to deal with damages?

With the calculations below, you’ll at least have an idea of how much a media center costs to house your television, should you choose to buy one at all. 

Since the furniture in your living area will vary so much, take the totals below with a grain of salt.

For example, if you have a studio or loft apartment you may opt for a lift-top coffee table. 

Conversely, you may want a roomier storage ottoman or larger coffee table if you have a bigger apartment living room. 

So, in the chart below, we included the estimated cost range of furnishing your apartment living room based on recommendations for your space. 

Totals include the price ranges of furnishing either a small studio/loft living room, or a larger apartment living room.

Ultimately, the cost of furnishing your apartment living room will be based on the style, quality, and lifestyle fit you prefer.

  Overstock Ashley HomeStore Wayfair
Lift-top coffee table (for smaller/studio living rooms) $199.99 $197.99 $319.99
Sleeper sofa (for studio/loft apartments) $819.99 (full to queen-size futon) $1,039.99 (seats 2 + chaise; queen-size sleeper) $919.99 (seats 2; queen-size sleeper)
Storage ottoman (for larger living rooms) $177.74 (Flip-top with tray) $399.99 $159.99
Sectional sofa (for larger living rooms) $1,351.34 (seats 3 + chaise) $1,679.99 (power reclining + chaise) $1,199.99 (removable & reversible cushions
Floor lamp $95.99 $88.99 $108.99
TV console/ entertainment center $219.99 $759.99 $839.99
Total Cost Range $1,335.96–$1,845.06 $2,086.96$2,928.96 $2,188.96$2,308.96
Studio/Loft Totals $1,335.96 $2,086.96 $2,188.96
Larger Living Rm. Totals $1,845.06 $2,928.96 $2,308.96
Total cost to furnish apartment living room

Bedroom Essentials

Ah, the sweet escape of your bedroom. If you’re going to be comfortable anywhere, it needs to be here. So don’t be afraid to invest well in your bedroom pieces

As far as mattresses are concerned, these are also highly personal based on your own likes/dislikes and needs. Costs for mattresses will range so widely depending on not only your own preferences, but also the brand, construction, and size. 

Naturally, the mattress costs also mostly depend on what you can actually fit into your apartment space—whether it’s a studio or multi-bedroom.

So no, we didn’t include the price for a mattress in our calculations below because there’s no way to choose between them all for you. 

However, according to the Sleep Foundation, you can expect to pay anywhere between $250-$3000+ for a mattress.

An excellent, cushy mattress doesn’t have to blow your budget, either! 

It’s a little-known fact that you can negotiate and price-match at most mattress stores, and we totally encourage you to! Sometimes they’ll throw in a free pillow. 

For this reason, we didn’t add pillows in the mix, but you absolutely need to have it on your shopping list. 

In fact, we encourage you to buy pillows and sheets at a brick-and-mortar store. Why?

The last thing you want to do is order exciting new bedding, only to have to return it later because it’s super uncomfortable.

You can avoid this by shopping around in person to touch and feel the pillows in the packaging. 

You’ll get a much better idea of whether a pillow is truly perfect for making your new apartment bedroom comfy. 

If you need new bedroom furniture for your apartment and are on a budget, we definitely suggest getting a set whenever possible. 

That means, at minimum, you’ll get a dresser, at least 1 nightstand, plus a bedframe all for one price

Just be sure to check if the bed frame requires a box spring for your mattress, because that could mean an added expense.

  Overstock Ashley HomeStore Wayfair
Laundry hamper $49.99 (3-bag sorter, rolling hamper) $29.99 (hamper with lid) $35.99 (rolling hamper)
Table lamp set $67.99 (2 pcs.) $133.99 (2 pcs.) $117.56 (2 pcs.)
Bedroom set $941.99 (queen bed, night stand, & chest $1,317.95 (queen bed + storage drawers, mirrored dresser, 2 nightstands) $1,369.97 (queen bed, mirrored dresser, 2 nightstands)
Clothes hangers $48.99 (100 pcs.) $29.99 (25 pcs.) $39.99 (100 pcs.)
Totals $1,108.96 $1,511.92 $1,563.51
Total cost to furnish apartment bedroom

Bathroom Essentials

Good news: 

Furnishing your bathroom is simple and straightforward. 

You will undoubtedly spend less on items for your bathroom compared to any other room of your apartment!

Depending on how much space you have in your apartment bathroom, you may need to buy a  small cabinet or drawers to store things like cleaning products, cosmetics, etc. 

If your space is limited, remember to always go upward in terms of the kinds of storage solutions you get. That means investing in shelves, tiered drawers, racks (even under the bathroom sink), etc.

All apartments will have a rack for rolls of toilet paper installed on the side of a wall or cabinet. So, although some people claim it’s a necessity when you move into an apartment, you don’t need a toilet paper stand. 

Not yet anyway… 

Unless you share your apartment bathroom with others or are the type who regularly ends up stranded during #2 without TP within arm’s reach. (In that case, PLEASE get one!)

But for now, you can do without and put that money where you really need it. 

You’ll need the following essentials, and as we’ve said before, it’s best to grab them in sets so you spend less and have fewer things to shop around for.

  Overstock Ashley HomeStore Wayfair
Plunger $49.99 (with toilet brush) $27.99 (no toilet brush included) $39.99 (with toilet brush)
Bathroom rug set $44.98 (2 pcs.; memory foam) $52.99 (2 pcs.) $47.99 (2 pcs.; memory foam)
Shower curtain (no liner) $29.98 $35.99 $54.99
Bath towels + washcloth set $35.10 (6 pcs.) $40.99 (6 pcs.) $47.99 (10 pcs.)
Small garbage can Nothing if you bought the set. (13 gal. & 2.5 gal., touchless, odor control. Use 13 gal for your kitchen!) Nothing if you bought the set.  (30L & 3L. Use the 30L for your kitchen!) Nothing if you bought the set. (30L & 8 gal. Use the 30L for your kitchen!)
Totals $160.05 $157.96 $190.96
Total cost to furnish apartment bathroom

So, How Much Does It Cost To Furnish Your Entire Apartment From Scratch?

Now that you’re clear on the ballpark costs involved to furnish each room of your apartment, let’s total it up by store based on the previous charts:

  Overstock.com Ashley HomeStore Wayfair
Studio/Loft $3,691.74 $4,710.76 $5,165.02
1-bedroom apartment $4,200.84 $5,552.76 $5,285.02
Cost of furnishing a studio & 1-bd apartment from scratch

Prefer rounder numbers?

Check out these estimates of how much you can spend at each store to furnish an apartment from scratch:

  • Expect to spend around $3,700 to $4,200 to furnish a studio to 1-bedroom apartment using Overstock.com
  • Expect to spend around $4,700 to $5,500 to furnish a studio to 1-bedroom apartment using Ashley HomeStore
  • Expect to spend around $5,200 to $5,300 to furnish a studio to 1-bedroom apartment using Wayfair.com

Wrapping Up

Whew, that was a lot to cover!

Now that you know:

  • Exactly what you’ll need right away in your apartment
  • What you don’t need to rush out and buy right away
  • General factors that impact your apartment furnishing budget
  • Your different options for buying new apartment furniture
  • The ballpark amounts you can expect to spend per room

…you’re ready to get to the fun part and start making your new apartment feel like home!

If the above retailers don’t really suit your taste, take heart!

We cover higher-quality, USA-based furniture options that cut the middleman and save you money in our next post. Plus, you’ll learn savvy ways to maximize your furniture budget.

How do you feel about buying furniture for your apartment now?

Did you find this post helpful? Share it with a friend, or tag us in your new apartment pics on the ‘gram (@3menmovers)!

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Moving In Summer? This Is Your Cool Safety Guide.


 

Planning on moving in the summer heat and trying not to fry like an egg on a hot sidewalk?  

Summer is peak moving season. So not only is it hot, but it’s the busiest time for both movers and residents.  

Considering the amount of time and effort involved in moving, you don’t want to waste time or overheat yourself or a moving crew. 

Can you picture the ultimate summertime post-move scenario:

Relaxing with your air conditioner blasting…

Stress-free and totally finished?

If you can’t, that’s cool (pun intended). Because, luckily for you, we’ve learned a thing or two throughout 30+ years of moving during Texan summers, when 100-degree temps are super common. 

Whether you’re hiring movers or DIYing it, check out these summer moving tips that will keep you cool and collected despite scorching temps and insects. 

1. Take Lots of Breaks in Hot Weather

It’s great to pride yourself on keeping a steady pace no matter what kind of work you do. But, remember, moving day is not the time to overexert yourself! Especially if you’re moving in summer when it often gets extremely hot outside.

Keep these tips in mind. They’ll be particularly helpful if you’re not used to lifting heavy items or have a medical condition vulnerable to heat:  

  • Be comfortable; don’t rush to avoid rest periods during your move. 
  • Have intervals for mini-breaks—time yourself or set reminders if necessary.
  • Sit in the shade whenever you start feeling winded, thirsty, or tired. 

You might not want to delay your move, but consider how a trip to the hospital would interrupt your day if you get severe dehydration or heatstroke! 

It’s not worth the risk. 

 

2. Stay Consistently Cool & Hydrated

You lose water when you sweat. If you do vigorous activity and don’t replace fluids as you go along, you can become dehydrated. Hot, humid weather increases the amount you sweat and the amount of fluid you lose.

Not a big water drinker? Well, now is the time to start! (At least on moving day.)

Buy a liter or gallon of water and get ready to build a new relationship with H2O. It’s what’s going to keep you alive during your summertime move! If you simply can’t bring yourself to drink plain water all day, try sports drinks like Gatorade

Either way, thorough hydration doesn’t just start on your move day. Try to start drinking water regularly at least 1-2 days before moving

Skip this, and you risk sweating out all your electrolytes after spending a couple of hours dragging your furniture and dozens of boxes out the door. The good news is that technology makes it simple to track your water intake, like this list of apps that fight dehydration.

Stick to these science-backed summer moving tips to stay hydrated:

  • Pack enough hydrating fluids for all day. 
  • Stick to drinking water, coconut water, or electrolyte-rich, sugarless sports drinks. 
  • Avoid dehydrating beverages high in caffeine or sugar, like energy drinks or juice.
  • Totally skip the alcohol (you can celebrate moving later!)
  • Pack a snack of fresh fruit, especially if you can’t carry a drink along.

Finally, who could forget about air conditioning

Living in Texas wouldn’t be the same without it, so make sure to set up your electricity service for your move day. You’ll want to make sure the lights and air conditioning are on at your new place before moving in summer!

 

3. Watch Out for Summertime Insects on Your Move Day

From 1997 to 2017 in July:  279 Americans died after being stung by hornets, wasps or bees. 2,917 Americans died from heat exposure. (CDC.gov)

Southern summers are notorious for insects.  

If you’re not familiar with the South, here our summers are pretty much a competition between bugs and the sun. 

With rainfall, high humidity, and lots of tasty humans hanging outside, it’s basically playtime for insects, including mosquitos. 

Mosquito-borne diseases—like the West Nile and Zika viruses—have also been found in the world’s deadliest animal here in Texas. So, it’s vital to protect yourself! 

Not to mention roaches, disease-carrying ticks, and other critters who like hitching rides on your stuff. The last thing you need is an infestation in your new home!

Stinging insects can also attack when feeling threatened by you or a mover who disturbs their nests. 

Use these tips to avoid insect issues when you’re moving in the summer:

  • Allergic or attractive to mosquitos? Book a fixed move time when mosquitoes are least active. Avoid dusk & dawn.  
  • Eliminate sources of standing water where mosquitoes like to breed. 
  • Apply an EPA-approved insect spray, but don’t use it on children under 2. Offer some to your movers, too!
  • Inspect all indoor & outdoor furniture and fabrics for infestations before deciding to take them with you.
  • Clear out fire ant hills, especially if they’re on the path to your new or former property. You don’t want to accidentally trip on them! 
  • Spray or hire a pest control company up to 1 month before moving.
  • Safely remove small wasp nests near outside corners or doorways. 
  • Always call a professional to remove larger nests of hives of ants, wasps, termites, or bees, which are more dangerous to you & your structure. 
  • Don’t spray beehives! Bee pesticides are often illegal and honeybee populations are critical to our food supplies. Call an apiary professional for help. 
  • Repair damage & clean residue so that your structure isn’t unstable and more critters don’t come around. (Extra important if you’re selling a home!)
  • Check and treat pets so they don’t carry ticks or fleas into your new place.
  • Avoid attracting ticks by wearing light-colored, long shirts and pants with the legs tucked into socks or high boots.

 

4. Overestimate the Power of the Sun

You can avoid sunburn, heat exhaustion, or heat-destroyed items by taking the right precautions when moving. 

Some smart tips to stay safe from the ravages of the summer sun when you’re moving: 

  • Check the weather forecast 1-7 days before your move to get prepared.
  • Stay hydrated using the tips in point #1; don’t wait until you’re thirsty.
  • Pick move time outside of rush-hour traffic. You can do this by booking early and packing ahead of time.
  • Wear appropriate SPF sunscreen for your skin tone (waterproof if you sweat heavily).
  • If you’re prone to sunburn, consider wearing additional sun protection (e.g. hats, sunglasses).
  • Choose light, loose-fitting clothing that is breathable and won’t snag on furniture
  • Wrap towels around frozen ice packs or place in a cooler full of ice for you and your movers to use. 
  • If you’re moving alone, load electronics last and unload them first so they’re not sitting in the heat. 
  • Only put heat-sensitive, combustible items in cool, well-ventilated areas away from vehicle windows
  • Plan to securely transport ammunition on your own. Most movers will not transport live ammo or loaded weapons, especially not in summer heat.
  • Unload, discharge, and clean any guns or gun safes before moving.
  • Never leave pets or children in cars unattended and/or without air conditioning. 

 

5. Recognize Signs of Heat Sickness in High Temperatures

Heatstroke is a condition caused by your body overheating, usually as a result of prolonged exposure to or physical exertion in high temperatures…. The condition is most common in the summer months.” 

—Mayo Clinic

Overexerting yourself?

Profusely sweating?

Staying outside for way too long?

Stuck in traffic with the sun baking your skin through your car windows?

Be wary because things could get dangerous.

In order to be prepared for any possibility, get familiar with the symptoms of heat-related illness in case it happens on your move day.

That way, you can get medical help for you or your movers, fast

See some common symptoms1, 2, 3 of dehydration, heat cramps, heat exhaustion, and heatstroke to look out for during your move:

Dehydration 

most mild

Heat Cramps

mildly serious

Heat Exhaustion

somewhat serious

Heatstroke

most serious

What it feels like: Extreme thirst.  Dizziness, fatigue, or confusion. Urine the color of apple juice or darker. Muscle pain, spasms, heavy sweating Fast, weak pulse; cool skin with goosebumps, faintness or dizziness, nausea, headache, low blood pressure if standing,  and/or muscle cramps. High temperature ( ≥ 104°F or 40°C).  Fast, strong pulse.  Hot, dry, red or damp skin. Confusion, agitation, passing out.  Dizziness, headache, or nausea.  Rapid breathing.
Where it happens: Mouth (due to thirst), head, or all over the body (sweating) Any muscle group you move a lot All over your body, especially the skin, head & stomach. All over your body.
What causes it (combined with heat): Excessive sweating, diarrhea, or vomiting.  Increased urination. Fluid and electrolyte loss, often from excessive sweating. Strenuous physical movement in high temperatures—especially with high humidity. Dehydration. Strenuous physical activity.  Drinking alcohol before moving.  Lack of air conditioning.  Certain health conditions.
What to do:  Stop physical activity to cool off.  Drink water or electrolytes. Rest for several hours.  Cool off.  Drink electrolytes. Loosen clothes.  Cool off with a bath, garden hose, or wet towels.  Sip water or electrolytes. Take a cool (not cold) bath or wet towels.  Remove excess clothing.
Seek a doctor if: Diarrhea is present for 24 hours or more.  Irritable, disoriented, or sluggish. Cramps last for over 1 hour.  You’re on a low-salt diet.  You have heart issues. Vomiting.  Symptoms get worse or last over 1 hour. Get the person to a cool place. Do not provide drinks. Seek medical help immediately. 

 

You can probably tell that it all starts with being adequately hydrated.  

If you or someone else starts experiencing those more serious symptoms during your move when it’s hot outside, pause the move, and seek medical attention immediately.

 

6. Let Professionals Handle Moving in Summer Heat

If you’re feeling a bit overwhelmed by these tips or if you’re worried about prolonged heat exposure, consider hiring a moving company to do the heavy lifting for you. 

Lower your moving anxiety by just concentrating on packing. This will prepare you to move without having to be outside long. 

Many moving companies in Texas have been helping people move in the heat for years. Specifically, we’re pros at it because we’ve been training professionals to move in scalding Texas summers for over three decades!  

Before you hire movers to help you in the summer, do these two things first:

  • Prepare and pack well to have a faster, efficient move. 
  • Know how many crew members are coming & their experience levels.

You’re paying by the hour. So ask your chosen company how long your designated crew has been moving. The last thing you want in summer is a rookie crew who isn’t used to moving in hot weather. Professional, experienced crews can move all day without excessive breaks.  

Many people wonder if they have to feed their movers. 

While we definitely appreciate the sentiment, we don’t recommend it.

But, it is nice to get a few cold bottles of water or sports drinks rich in electrolytes (like Gatorade or Pedialyte) to offer the crew. 

Dehydration is exhausting and can stifle our mental and physical reflexes.

So, helping your moving crew stay sharp and hydrated can only benefit your move!

 

Wrapping Up

Whether you’re moving from one Texan city to another, or if you’re simply brand-new to a place with sweltering heat, moving in the summer is going to be a challenge if you’re not prepared.

Sure, you might have grand plans to spend all day lugging your belongings from your house to the moving truck, but those plans will probably change after 10 minutes in the Texas heat! (And no, it’s not a dry heat. It’s pretty humid, which means it’s more like wet, sticky, uncomfortable heat). 

Granted, this doesn’t mean you have to postpone your move until fall. 

Follow the tips above, and you’ll safely survive moving in the summer heat with no sweat.

 

 


Sources: 

  1. Mayo Clinic. 2017. “Heat Exhaustion – Symptoms and Causes.” MayoClinic.Org. Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research (MFMER). 2017. 
  2. 2019. “Heatstroke – Symptoms and Causes.” MayoClinic.Org. Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research (MFMER). July 16, 2019. 
  3. National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH), Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR). 2017. “Warning Signs and Symptoms of Heat-Related Illness.” CDC.gov. Centers for Disease Control. September 1, 2017.
  4. UPMC Sports Medicine. 2016. “Hydration: The Importance of Replacing Sweat Losses.” UPMC.com. University of Pittsburgh: Schools of the Health Sciences. ‌

The Ultimate, No-Panic Guide to Moving in 2 Weeks


Are you moving out of a house or apartment in 2 weeks and still not ready?

Sure, you’ve got a lot to do in a less-than-ideal amount of time—but it is doableAnd, yes, you can still move. 

Below we cover exactly how to move from anywhere—house or apartment. You’ll know exactly what to do in advance, each week, and the day of your move, plus a free checklist and tips to make the entire process much easier!

Top Things to Do 2 Weeks Ahead (No Matter Where You’re Moving)

“Two weeks will fly by fast, and spots fill up quickly.”

Erin. 3 Men Movers Market Manager, Austin

You probably thought you had more time. After all, two weeks can seem like enough. 

But, it really isn’t… Especially considering everything you have to do, like: 

  • Find a moving company
  • Donate or get rid of anything you don’t want to take with you
  • Packing everything you own (this includes getting the supplies, closing/taping and labeling boxes) 
  • Handle other move-related errands (like changing your address, vehicle, or voter registration, setting up new utilities, etc)
  • And finally, the actual move day

Not to mention unpacking and setting up your new place, or shopping around for anything you need to get settled.

Remember, you’re also competing with hundreds of other people who need to move due to expiring leases!

So, if you’ve done absolutely none of the above, take a deep breath, read on, and download the FREE two-week moving checklist below.

Download Your Free 2-Week Moving Checklist 

Whether you’re moving from a house or apartment, this free, 3-page guide will help you prepare in under two weeks.

Grab the freebie below!

checklist to move in 2 weeks

 

How to Prepare to Move in 2 Weeks:

In the third episode of our Master Your Move series, Erin, our Austin Market Manager, even gives her best advice for moving out in a time crunch

Here are Erin’s top tips on how to prepare for a moving company within two weeks—whether you live in an apartment or a house!

Erin highly recommends some key steps to prepare for moving company in just 2 weeks… no matter where you’re moving to or from:

1. Book a mover as fast as possible.

This is extremely important during peak moving seasons (like summer) when tons of people are moving. Not sure what to look for? We’ve got just the right questions to ask—especially if you want to move quickly—and how to find a legitimate company.  

2. Clearly label all boxes & items

Mark the contents and indicate anything fragile inside (especially glassware!)

3. Check on parking or truck access from the street.

Speak to your landlord or neighbors first to avoid any conflicts.

4. Schedule any necessary appointments as far in advance as possible

Think of anything that could be impacted by your move being longer or shorter than expected (e.g. reserving an elevator, hiring an electrician, locating cleaners or specialty disposal, finding contractors to disassemble/install certain items like playground or workout equipment).

You’ll also want to note the times so your movers can hustle prior to any contractor or vendor visits to your new home.

5. Prepare packing supplies.

Take stock of the easily damaged things you have to move. These could be TVs, mirrors, glasses, artwork, jewelry, or more. This will help you know the types and quantities of moving supplies you need to get prior to your move.

If you’re packing alone, use supplies that will make packing easier: strong boxes, packing tape, permanent markers, blankets for wrapping, bubble wrap, leg casters, box dividers (or clean towels) for glasses and dishes, and plastic wrap or tarp for transporting live, potted plants.  

MASTER TIP: Use the boxes or cases that your devices came in to pack them up (e.g. TVs, jewelry, lamps, cookware). 

6. Call your moving company and check your appointment.

If movers haven’t already done a virtual or in-person walkthrough, take photos or video and send it to them yourself.

This is critical if you’re using the company’s packing services

MASTER TIP: Open all closets, cabinets, doors, and drawers so your movers can accurately gauge how much they’ll be packing and/or moving. Review your quote with them and ask about any additional fees not outlined that could be tacked on if they need to pack your items.

7. Get a good night’s rest 1-2 nights before moving.

Sleep deprivation adds up and can leave you less than alert.

Trust us, you don’t want to be grumpy, groggy, or forgetful on your move day!

8. Pack up the last things you’ll use in the morning.

Toiletries, cosmetics, medication/vitamins, snacks, dog food, kid’s supplies—think of everything you know you’ll need to use on move day that won’t go on the truck.

Keep them easily accessible in a grab bag to toss in your vehicle.

The same goes for live, potted plants. Movers can’t legally transport these in a moving truck, so make room in your vehicle while protecting your floors and upholstery.

MASTER TIP:  Wrap plants and tarp your floor so the soil doesn’t spill.

9. Have your payment ready.

When you first book and sign, all scheduled charges should be explained and documented upfront. You definitely don’t want your move day to arrive and you’re unable to pay. Legally, moving companies can retain your items on their trucks until you can pay as agreed in your contract. No one likes being in that situation, so make sure you have enough money to cover your move (you can always call the mover later if there’s an issue!)  MASTER TIP: If payment is a problem, save yourself and your moving company some awkwardness and cancel or reschedule for when you’re ready. 

10. Check labels & move boxes out of the way.

The best way to make your move faster? Clear a path for your movers to get to and from your apartment door/garage.

It also helps to have fragile boxes in a separate section from heavier items.

Finally, double-check that any descriptions on fragile or important boxes haven’t been mislabeled or misplaced.

MASTER TIP:  Make sure any fragile items are clearly marked on all sides of the box with an arrow facing upwards. 

11. Do one last sweep with movers before leaving.

The worst feeling is leaving something behind.

(It’s also a nightmare if you’re moving long-distance!)

Avoid this by doing one final sweep of your entire apartment or home when before you and the movers head to your new place.

 

How to Prepare to Move From an Apartment in 2 Weeks:

If you’re making the move from an apartment to a house, you’ll have some specific things to consider. Most likely, you’ll have more time constraints moving out than moving into a neighborhood.

According to Erin, here’s how to prep two weeks before moving out of your apartment

As soon as you know you’re moving out of an apartment:

  • Repair any & all damages. This is a big one because apartments will charge you for damages after you’ve moved out (even if they were already there). While you still live in your apartment, it’s 100% free to notify your leasing office about existing damages and have them repaired!
  • RSVP at your apartment complex. You might be required to reserve an elevator, parking spots, or do certain things before you move. The complex may also need to adhere to certain procedures or do things like install hangers in your reserved elevator for the movers. Talk to the leasing office in advance and give them ample details. 
  • Clean your apartment thoroughly. Tackle the biggest, dirtiest jobs first (do a bit every day). Lighter cleaning can wait until move day so you’re not overwhelmed or in the way. You could even get your deposit back if it’s clean enough! MASTER TIP: Schedule your move so you have an extra day to intensively clean your apartment after all the furniture is gone. 

5-7 days before moving from your apartment:  

  • Start packing everything. Being overwhelmed is a major factor of stress during move day. Packing early eliminates that. Moving companies often offer packing and/or unpacking if you don’t want to do it all on your own. At 3 Men Movers, we not only offer both services, but our unpackers will organize everything so you’re prepared to start living.
  • Declutter & see what you can sell/give away. This is a great time not only to pack, but to go through any junk or things you no longer want that can be donated. Certain clothing consignments may be able to give you extra cash for your unwanted attire, or you can drop them off at nonprofit centers.  

2-4 days before moving from your apartment:  

  • Revisit your apartment office & recap your move day. Is there anything you forgot to tell the leasing office? Perhaps there’s something your movers told you that changes your plans a bit? Either way, let your office know. On the flip side, inform your leasing office how your move day will generally go and ensure all your reservations still stand, uninterrupted. Review parking options and the permitted loading areas, then relay this info to your moving company. (You don’t want movers wasting any time trying to determine where to park or load). 
  • Wrap up any major cleaning and repairs. Even if you’ve booked your move so that you have an extra day to clean your empty apartment, you should still have most of it done. Repairs should definitely be done at least a day before movers set foot in your apartment. 

The same day you’re moving out of an apartment:  

  • Communicate with your movers. While they should have all the important information before they arrive, it never hurts to check twice. Call the company when they open and ask if everything is on schedule
  • When movers arrive, show them everything. Like where certain things are, (e.g., stairs, parking and loading dock, elevators, etc.) Also, during peak seasons, some highly-requested crews may be busier than normal. If you’re not the first appointment of the day, this could push back your move start time a bit—especially if the previous job had more items than expected or if they weren’t totally prepared. 


Ho to Prepare to Move From a House in 2 Weeks:

If you’re moving from a house, you do have more flexibility as far as time and parking availability. But there are still some ways you can specifically prepare if you’re two weeks away from moving and not ready. 

As soon as you know you’re moving out of a house:

  • Start packing right away. You might have fewer time constraints than an apartment-dweller, but none of that matters if you’re not packed before move day. Start cleaning and clearing out old junk, too. You’ll likely have more unwanted stuff if you live in a house rather than an apartment. 
  • Talk to your neighbors. Communicate with your neighbors in advance so there will be a spot for your movers’ truck. You don’t want your movers to have to compete with other contractors or personal vehicles if your neighbors are using services or hosting gatherings on the same day. Your move will definitely take longer if crew members have to walk from down the street to move items out of your home.
  • Book your move at the appropriate time. While you don’t have to worry about handing over the keys to a leasing agent right away, you still should be considerate. So when you’re scheduling your move, keep in mind any conflicting information you uncovered while speaking with neighbors. 

7-10 days before moving from a house:  

  • Get repairs and contracting services done. If you’re renting, ask your landlord about repairs. 
  • Thoroughly label and number your boxes. As listed under the General tips, you should already have gotten moving boxes and supplies and started packing. Besides simply writing ‘fragile’ on your boxes, number them to match the rooms they will go into at the new place. (More on that below).

5-10 days before moving out of a house:

  • Schedule contractors to dismantle any special or expensive items. Certain furniture and equipment must be dismantled before moving (like grandfather clocks, light fixtures, Peloton bikes, gun safes that are bolted into the floor or need doors removed). 
  • Get the proper equipment, casing, boxes, wraps, etc. for any instruments, jewelry, ammunition).

1-2 days before your move from a house:

  • Communicate any obstacles getting to your home. When your moving company opens, give them a call to let them know if there’s anything out of the ordinary. Is your street clear? Are your neighbors doing construction or expecting lots of cars on the street? Will there be any hills that movers have to traverse while hauling your stuff to the truck? What about low-hanging trees or cables?
  • Assist with a virtual walkthrough. Send your moving company photos of how much stuff you need to move. A simple cell phone photo of each room will do, but remember to snap your closets, cabinets, dressers with clothing, and outdoor furniture. Knowing how much and what you have to move will help the moving company send you the right crew and inform you of any fee changes. No one likes surprise charges after moving!
  • Check on any storage facility restrictions.  On move day, the clock will be ticking and most movers charge hourly. So waiting on any mishaps at a storage facility could end up being expensive. If you’re moving things into or out of storage, make sure a facility manager is there in case you have issues. It’s also vital to know whether the storage company restricts moves after a certain time
  • Do your laundry. This goes without saying, but no one wants to transport dirty clothing. Plus, you may be able to use clean linens to help you pack delicate items
  • Set up utilities in your new space. Set up or transfer your cable, internet, water, gas, and electricity before your move. In some areas of Texas, like DFW and Houston, you can choose your electricity provider and shop for the cheapest electricity rate.
  • Clean & disconnect appliances. Any appliances like washers, dryers, and refrigerators should be disconnected at least 24 hours in advance of your move. Some movers will assist you with this, but many others won’t (movers generally aren’t trained to do that kind of thing).  Moving companies will often ask you to waive liability so they aren’t responsible if anything goes wrong. If you need help with disconnecting and reconnecting a washer or dryer, ask your chosen moving company during booking.  
  • MASTER TIP: For dryers, make sure the vent is thoroughly cleaned before installing it in your new home. 

The same day you’re moving out of your home:

  • Charge your cell phone. Before—or even during—your move, the moving company or crew may need to get in touch with you. Keep your cell phone on you and charged at all times so you and your movers don’t miss any important news.  Don’t forget to turn up your ringer volume!
  • Prepare everything you need to use that day. If there are things you know you’ll need (like snacks, medications, or your toothbrush) keep them separate in a backpack or tote bag.
  • Do a walkthrough before & after moving furniture. It seems repetitive, but we can’t stress this enough: open every closet, cabinet, and drawer before your movers start and after everything is moved out. Before you head off to your destination, don’t forget to do one final walkthrough with your movers to ensure nothing’s left behind. It’s also crucial to clear out any drawers with clothing or drawers before dressers get lifted and shifted on a dolly, so items and inner parts don’t rip or break. Make sure the movers do a final check of the truck after you move into the new space. 
  • Label the doors of each room to match your boxes.  Using a sticky note, copy the numbers you put on the boxes to denote where each box will go at your new place. This will prevent movers from constantly having to ask where you want every box placed, and will generally speed up your move.  

*Special Note on When to Pack a House: 

We typically recommend that you start packing a house one month in advance. But if you have a house to pack and haven’t done anything at all, start now

How much time you dedicate to packing and how much you have to pack are huge factors in how long your move takes. 

Will you spend 8 hours a day packing over the course of one or two weekends? 

Do you work such long hours that packing by yourself for 12 hours isn’t possible? 

If either of these scenarios describe your situation, we recommend either packing anywhere from 30 to 60 days in advance. Depending on how much time you’re able to dedicate to finding the supplies and packing everything yourself, you should consider hiring professional packers to ease the workload.

More on what to expect from packers, here

Wrapping Up

If you’re worried about having a last-minute move and have only two weeks to plan—relax

The best thing you can do now is to pack, find a mover, and follow this guide to moving from a house or apartment in 2 weeks